stippling


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stippling

 [stip´ling]
a spotted condition or appearance, such as an appearance of the retina as if dotted with light and dark points, or the spotted appearance of the erythrocytes in basophilia.
gingival stippling the presence of a minutely lobulated surface on the gingiva, like that of an orange peel; it is a normal adaptive process, varying from one person to another. Its absence or reduction indicates gingival disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

stip·pling

(stip'ling),
1. A speckling of a blood cell or other structure with fine dots when exposed to the action of a basic stain, due to the presence of free basophil granules in the cell protoplasm. Synonym(s): punctate basophilia
2. An orange peel appearance of the attached gingiva.
3. A roughening of the surfaces of a denture base to stimulate natural gingival stippling.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
A punctate appearance or, in radiology, white granularity in a radiolucent background, similar to ‘salt-and-pepper’
Endoscopy-colonoscopy A pattern of fine granularity of the mucosa, seen in early ulcerative colitis
Oesophagoscopy A pattern in esophagitides due to corrosive agents, reflux, infections—e.g., candidiasis—or radiation therapy
Haematology See Basophilic stippling
Imaging Bone Punctate calcifications in epiphyseal ossification centers, which may occur in congenital calcific chondrodystrophy, congenital hypothyroidism (cretinism), ischemic necrosis (osteochondrosis), multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, pituitary gigantism, sclerotic osteopetrosis or osteopoikilosis
Imaging-Kidneys A pattern seen in papillary transitional cell carcinomas with incomplete filling of the pelvicaliceal system due to tumoural replacement in the intravenous pyelogram
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

stippling

A punctate appearance or, in radiology, white granularity in a radiolucent background, similar to the 'salt-and-pepper' Bone radiology Punctate calcifications in epiphyseal ossification centers, which may occur in congenital calcific chondrodystrophy, cretinism, ischemic necrosis–osteochondrosis, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, pituitary gigantism, sclerotic osteopetrosis or osteopoikilosis Colonoscopy A pattern of fine granularity of the mucosa, seen in early ulcerative colitis Esophagoscopy A pattern in esophagitides due to corrosive agents, reflux, infections–eg, candidiasis, RT Renal imaging A pattern seen in papillary transitional cell carcinomas with incomplete filling of the pelvi-caliceal system due to tumoral replacement in the intravenous pyelogram.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stip·pling

(stip'ling)
1. A speckling of a blood cell or other structure with fine dots when exposed to the action of a basic stain, due to the presence of free basophil granules in the cell protoplasm.
2. An orange-peel appearance of the attached gingiva, which is a normal adaptive process; its absence or reduction indicates gingival disease.
3. A roughening of the surfaces of a denture base to stimulate natural gingival stippling.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

stip·pling

(stip'ling)
1. Orange peel appearance of attached gingiva.
2. Roughening of surfaces of a denture base to stimulate natural gingival stippling.
3. Speckling of a blood cell or other structure with fine dots when exposed to the action of a basic stain, due to presence of free basophil granules in cell protoplasm.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Quite a few stippling tips can apply a functional texture and a clean look without having to create a flowing, intricate pattern.
For a gun destined for hard use, I prefer a lot of stippling coverage, well laid-out to follow and complement the natural lines of the gun.
There was no soot and stippling that would suggest that he was shot at close-range.'
Travel stitch back along your starting line and branch off with more Stippling to fill in the background surrounding the star before forming another straight-lined star nearby.
From observation, to practice drawings to final compositions, stippling, shading, and finally the watercolor, students embrace each part with enthusiasm.
And in the skeletal system the anomalies seen are stippling of uncalcified epiphyses, particularly of axial skeleton (vertebrae and pelvis), at the proximal femora and in the calcanei; stippling disappears after the first year.
Mr Vecht is clear, however, that the finest artist of all was Frans Greenwood (1630-1763): 'There are maybe only 50 signed Greenwoods in the world.' Greenwood, born in Rotterdam of British parents, was the supreme master of stippling. One example, signed and dated 1722, was sold at Christie's Amsterdam in 2002 for 64,625 [euro].
Use Bourjois Healthy Mix Serum Foundation all over your face, applying it with a Real Techniques Stippling Brush.
Half-fill a plastic bag with rags and get a friend to apply either 50:50 diluted emulsion paint or glaze with a brush then follow behind them stippling the wet glaze/paint with the scrunched-up poly bag.
This is a technique artists call stippling. It is usually used with pen and ink, but if you have a fine-tipped black marker, that will work too.
Unfortunately though, a few of these were scanned before printing which washed out the stippling. The six-page reference list cites virtually everything written on Early Silurian trilobites going back to the early 1800s, and everything about Anticosti Island geology since the 1700s (except, curiously, the excellent sedimentological study on the Lower Silurian by T.
Different methods, from ragging to antique and basic stippling and creating a parchment effect using newsprint, are covered in plenty of detail.