stipes


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

stipes

(stī′pēz)
n. pl. stipites (stĭp′ĭ-tēz′)
The basal segment of the maxilla of an insect or certain other arthropods.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is no significant difference between the two means of stipe strength (Student's t test with unequal variances, P > 0.
Carrington found no significant relationship between cross-sectional area of the stipe and thallus planform area (P [much greater than] 0.
Samples that exhibited weakening of the stipe tissue due to storm damage, repeated stress, grazing, or other factors were not included in our collection for this study.
5 mm, linear-lanceolate, orange-yellowish, marginally entire; phyllopodia present, 7-12 mm long; fronds 27-40 cm long; stipes 1/5-1/4 of frond length; stipe scales 2-5 x 0.
5 mm, linear-lanceolate, brown-yellowish, marginally entire to sparce ciliate, plane, deciduous with old; phyllopodia present, 10-20 mm long, robust, persistent; fronds 50-68 cm long, 1-3 (-10) mm distant; stipes ca.
1/4-1/3) stipes, narrowly elliptic to narrowly oblanceolate (vs.
Hymenium: Gills, free of the stipe, crowded, broad, pallid to white turning pink to pinkish-tan as spores mature.
Partial veil: White to off-white, cortinate, leaving an evanescent ring or zone on the upper stipe.
Stipe: 2-5 cm long, 3-5 mm thick at the apex, equal to enlarging below; smokey to blackish-brown velvety pubescence over the lower 2/3-3/4 of the stipe.
pale brown-yellowish to orange-yellowish); shorter stipes of the sterile blades (1/5--1/3 vs.
0 mm, linear to linear-lanceolate, pale-brown to atropurpureous, marginally entire to occasionally dentate; phyllopodia 2-6 mm (not visible for the scales); fronds 23-52 cm long; stipes 2/5-1/2 the frond length; stipe scales 1.
Stipe is cylindrical, young fruit Stipe is cylindrical, thin, bodies are quite thick, and ripe sometimes with a thickening at ones are more or less thin, with a the bottom; above a ring it claviform thickening at the bottom; has a cap's colour, below it-- above a ring it is whitish, below a it is darker.