sting

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sting

 [sting]
1. injury caused by a poisonous substance produced by an animal or plant (biotoxin) and introduced into or onto an individual, together with mechanical trauma incident to such introduction.
2. the organ used to inflict such injury.
bee sting see bee sting.
insect sting see insect bites and stings.

sting

(sting),
1. Sharp momentary pain, most commonly produced by the puncture of the skin by many species of arthropods, including hexapods, myriapods, and arachnids; can also be produced by jellyfish, sea urchins, sponges, mollusks, and several species of venomous fish, such as the stingray, toadfish, rabbitfish, and catfish.
2. The venom apparatus of a stinging animal, consisting of a chitinous spicule or bony spine and a venom gland or sac.
3. To introduce (or the process of introducing) a venom by stinging.
[O.E. stingan]

sting

(sting)
1. injury due to a biotoxin introduced into an individual or with which he comes in contact, together with the mechanical trauma incident to its introduction.
2. the organ used to inflict such injury.

sting

(stĭng)
v. stung (stŭng), stinging, stings
v.tr.
1. To pierce or wound painfully with a sharp-pointed structure or organ, as that of certain insects.
2. To cause to feel a sharp, smarting pain: smoke stinging our eyes.
v.intr.
1. To have, use, or wound with a sharp-pointed structure or organ: Do all bees sting?
2. To cause a sharp, smarting pain: The needle will sting a little.
n.
1. The act of stinging.
2. The wound or pain caused by stinging.
3. A sharp, piercing organ or part, often ejecting a venomous secretion, as the modified ovipositor of a bee or wasp or the spine of certain fishes.

sting′ing·ly adv.

sting

Etymology: AS, stingan
an injury caused by a sharp, painful penetration of the skin, often accompanied by exposure to an irritating chemical or the venom of an insect or other animal. In cases of hypersensitivity, a highly venomous sting, or multiple stings, anaphylactic shock may occur. Kinds of stings include bee, jellyfish, scorpion, sea urchin, and shellfish stings. See also stingray, wasp.

sting

Medtalk The injury caused by an injected venom from a plant or animal. See Hymenopteran sting, Scorpion sting, Wasp sting.

sting

(sting)
1. Sharp momentary pain, most commonly produced by puncture of the skin by many species of arthropods, including hexapods, myriapods, and arachnids; can also be produced by jellyfish, sea urchins, sponges, mollusks, and several species of venomous fish, such as the stingray, toadfish, rabbitfish, and catfish.
See also: bites
2. The venom apparatus of a stinging animal, consisting of a chitinous spicule or bony spine and a venom gland or sac.
3. To introduce (or the process of introducing) a venom by stinging.

sting

an organ present in many different animal groups that is capable of injecting a poison into other organisms as either a defensive or an offensive mechanism. Examples include the modified ovipositor in HYMENOPTERA, cnidoblasts in coelenterata, the tail in scorpion.

sting

(sting)
Sharp momentary pain, most commonly produced by puncture of the skin by arthropods, including hexapods, myriapods, and arachnids; can also be produced by jellyfish, sea urchins, sponges, mollusks, and several species of venomous fish, such as the stingray, toadfish, rabbitfish, and catfish.

sting,

n an injury caused by a sharp, painful penetration of the skin, often accompanied by exposure to an irritating chemical or the venom of an insect or other animal. Can also be considered a prick.

sting

1. injury caused by a poisonous substance produced by an animal or plant (biotoxin) and introduced into a patient which it contacts, together with mechanical trauma incident to its introduction. See also insect bites and stings.
2. the organ used to inflict such injury.
3. the illicit prerace administration of a stimulant to a horse with the object of improving its performance.

Patient discussion about sting

Q. How to treat a bee sting? We went on a picnic today and my son was stung by a bee. How to treat it?

A. if your son is allergic to bees venom- you need to inject epinephrine very fast and take him to the nearest hospital. but if his not allergic- nothing. if the bee left it's sting try removing it with flicking motion of the fingers, not by grabbing it- this will inject any venom that didn't enter right inside. and calm the kid down and tell him it's not the end of the world. the bee probably though he is a flower and tasted like nectar.

Q. Does a bee allergy always lead to a state of life risk when being stinged? And how is it possible to avoid bees when allergic?

A. Thanks bianca!! I hate bees and actually really afraid to get stinged...

Q. what do i do first if i got stung by a bee? and i am allergic ... :)

A. People who are known to be severely allergic to bee sting usually carry on themselves an adrenaline injection (called epipen etc.), which should be given in order to prevent serious complications of the allergic reaction (like blockage of air flow to the lungs and shock), and then seek medical attention.

However, these measures are prescribed by a doctor, so if you have any questions regarding this subject, you should consult one (e.g. immunologist).

You may read more here:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/anaphylaxis/DS00009

More discussions about sting
References in periodicals archive ?
Thinking about her elemental poems, which are so cheeky and rash, so stingingly honest, impertinent, and deathward-leaning, so filled with mordant wit and comic desperation ("learn too that being comical," she explains in a poem about Jesus, "does not ameliorate the desperation"), I keep wanting to adapt something Randall Jarrell once wrote about Walt Whitman.
Some of his literary gestures work less well than others here--the plot-heavy take on character actor Bob Balaban's repetitious roles is repetitious, for instance, and the photos that speckle the book are less interesting aesthetically and thematically than they might be (with the exception of one very funny collage-text)--but in large part this is a breathtakingly intelligent project of confession and appropriation textured with electric insights, glassy prose, and a cool, dry, arch irony about David Shields's favorite subject, David Shields, a character at once stingingly self-aware and painfully forlorn: "I don't know what's the matter with me--why I'm an adept only at distance, why I feel so remote from things, why life feels like a rumor.
It angers me that the assumption is stingingly correct.
I think underneath it all he's a guy that wouldn't harm anybody, but he's kind of got ideas above his station, and he thinks he's perhaps more attractive and more fun than he is a with more personality than he actually has, '' she says stingingly.
Add a bull whip and you'll have a recipe for a stingingly sexy new love life.
The first major feature about pro football in a generation, since the comical "Semi-Tough" and the stingingly disenchanted "North Dallas Forty," "Sunday" is a project that Stone said he conceived as an homage to Robert Aldrich, a sort of combination of "The Dirty Dozen" and the director's prison football yarn, "The Longest Yard.
And nuns have been a stage fave, treated comically in "Nunsense" and stingingly in Christopher Durang's "Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You.
Now a second rebellion is brewing, born of decades of impoverishment, the continuing denigration of Mizrachi culture and, most stingingly, the budget-trimming government's sudden willingness to spend hitherto unavailable funds on some 400,000 recently arrived Russian immigrants.
We've also got a string of other top writers including pal-of-the-stars Matthew Wright, the stingingly witty Brian Reade and TV's top pundit Charlie Catchpole.
When Langston Hughes wrote those words in The Nation in 1926, his assessment of racism's role in the lives of Afro-American artists was stingingly accurate.