stinging nettle


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stinging nettle

(stĭng′ĭng)
n.
A perennial nettle (Urtica dioica) native to Eurasia and widely distributed in North America. It is sometimes used medicinally, and the young leaves are edible.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

stinging nettle

Herbal medicine
A perennial herb that contains acetyl-choline, formic acid, histamine, minerals and vitamins A and C; it is astringent, diuretic, tonic, and administered as an infusion, poultice or applied topically (the leaves act as a counterirritant). Stinging nettle is used for arthritis, baldness, cystitis, diabetes, diarrhoea, eczema, epistaxis, gout, hay fever, haemorrhoids, rheumatic complaints and tuberculosis; it may be used under the supervision of a physician for congestive heart failure and hypertension.
 
Toxicity
Uncooked nettle may cause renal damage; the diuresis-related loss of potassium should be compensated for by increasing potassium intake; it should not be given to young children.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

nettle

(net'el)
Any plant of the genus Urtica. Its sawtoothed leaves contain hairs that secrete a fluid that irritates the skin. Extracts from nettles are used as herbal remedies to treat allergic rhinitis and kidney stones. Synonym: stinging nettle

stinging nettle

Nettle.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Stinging nettle is a Tier 2 supplement for prostatitis, meaning that there are significant clinical studies and research on using stinging nettle for prostatitis and similar prostate conditions.
The purpose of the present study was to start by identifying the most potent extracts and ultimately the bioactive compound(s) derived from stinging nettle to facilitate evaluation of their anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic mechanisms in order to lead to optimal formulations that would be the most effective for OA clinical evaluations.
Eating nettles: Eating stinging nettles? Yes, eating!
Stinging nettle root has diuretic, antihypertensive, immunostimulatory, and anti-inflammatory effects.
One of the most popular plants is stinging nettle (Urtica dioica, Urticaceae family).
Urtica Dioica (stinging nettle) can eliminate the uric acid crystals that causes gout' take 15 drops twice daily before meals.
Three herbs grow abundantly in our area in the woods and on roadsides; stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis), and burdock (Arctium lappa).
Herbs - evening primrose, ginger, stinging nettle and curcumin - are sold as remedies, despite no conclusive scientific proof they work.
At that time, three of our band members or their relatives were using an herb known as stinging nettle to relieve arthritis pain.
Brush against stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) and you'll know how it got its name.
1 THE STING IT'S believed that stinging nettles can help treat a wide variety of health conditions, and drinking stinging nettle tea or tucking into a bowl of stinging nettle soup can help the body expel toxins.
sTing It's believed 1The that stinging nettles can help treat a wide variety of health conditions, and drinking stinging nettle tea or tucking into a bowl of stinging nettle soup can help the body expel toxins.