stimulus duration

stimulus duration

the length of time a stimulus must be applied for the resulting nerve impulse to produce excitation in the receptor tissue. In general, more intense stimuli require shorter excitation times to effect cellular response. Any stimulus that acts too briefly to overcome the threshold intensity of the receptor cell will not elicit a response.
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We found that the guilty group showed a positive bias toward relevant stimuli when the stimuli were presented for 500 ms, but the intergroup difference was not significant at this stimulus duration.
Although they proved that GSK1521498 (a selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist) at 5 mg/day significantly reduced attentional bias for food pictures (dot probe task) versus placebo at longer stimulus duration (2000 ms), the treatment had no effect on the Stroop task.
Contrary to the universalist account, we found language-specific interference in a duration reproduction task, where stimulus duration conflicted with its physical growth," the researchers wrote in the study.
Shorter stimulus duration may be one of the possible factors causing low efficiency in discrimination tasks (Gold et al.
A bisection point is the point in the psychometric function relating stimulus duration and proportion of long responses at which 50% of responses are predicted to be long.
The various models of timing deal with responding in the absence of stimuli during interfood intervals or with the differential responding to stimulus duration.
Another argument against a stimulus duration effect is the strong negative, probably distracting effect of painting-valence on music valence: pleasant music becomes neutral (valence ratings shifts to 5) if paired with pleasant paintings; the iso-directional effect of valence of music on painting is reversed here in a strong neutralizing effect of pleasant painting.
For all electrical stimulation experiments, the stimulating voltage was adjusted at just above threshold for the desired electrical response, with a similar adjustment of stimulus duration of 1-10 ms.
A Student t-test compared the two groups in their ability to identify fear, sadness, anger, disgust, and surprise at each of the three stimulus duration times.
Overall group test results are in line with our previous studies: vowel openness correlates positively with stimulus duration in all subjects' groups (Figure 1).
In general, the body of research currently suggests that pain thresholds increase (11) and pain tolerance decreases (12) with advancing age; however, the specific qualities of these differences are dependent upon the nature of the noxious stimulus (thermal, mechanical) as well as the stimulus duration, size and location.