stimulus


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to stimulus: unconditioned stimulus, stimuli

stimulus

 [stim´u-lus] (L.)
any agent, act, or influence that produces functional or trophic reaction in a receptor or an irritable tissue.
conditioned stimulus a stimulus that acquires the ability to evoke a given response by repeatedly being linked with another stimulus that naturally evokes that response; see also conditioning.
depolarizing stimulus a stimulus that lowers the resting potential, making the inside of a fiber less negative. In cardiac fibers this means bringing the resting potential from −90 mV to −70 mV.
discriminative stimulus a stimulus associated with reinforcement, which exerts control over a given type of behavior; the subject must discriminate between closely related stimuli and respond positively only with this particular stimulus.
eliciting stimulus any stimulus, conditioned or unconditioned, that elicits a response.
threshold stimulus a stimulus that is just strong enough to elicit a response.
unconditioned stimulus any stimulus that naturally evokes a specific response; see also conditioning.

stim·u·lus

, pl.

stim·u·li

(stim'yū-lŭs, -lī),
1. A stimulant.
2. That which can elicit or evoke action (response) in a muscle, nerve, gland or other excitable tissue, or cause an augmenting action upon any function or metabolic process.
[L. a goad]

stimulus

(stĭm′yə-ləs)
n. pl. stimu·li (-lī′)
1. Something causing or regarded as causing a response.
2. An agent, action, or condition that elicits or accelerates a physiological or psychological activity or response.

stim·u·lus

, pl. stimuli (stim'yū-lŭs, -lī)
1. A stimulant.
2. That which can elicit or evoke action (response) in a muscle, nerve, gland or other excitable tissue, or cause an augmenting action on any function or metabolic process.
[L. a goad]

stimulus

Anything that causes a response, either in an excitable tissue or in an organism.

stimulus

any detectable change in the environment (internal or external) of an organism which is capable of activating a receptor and thus producing a RESPONSE in the whole organism or parts of it.

Stimulus

A factor capable of eliciting a response in a nerve.
Mentioned in: Pain, Pain Management

stimulus 

Any agent or environmental change that provokes a response. Plural: stimuli. See action potential.
adequate stimulus A stimulus of sufficient intensity and of appropriate nature to provoke a response in a given receptor. Visible light is the adequate stimulus for the eye, but pressure on the eye that may nevertheless produce a response (called a phosphene) is an inadequate stimulus.
inadequate stimulus 
See adequate stimulus.
liminal stimulus A stimulus of an intensity such that it just provokes a response that is at threshold. Syn. threshold stimulus.
threshold stimulus See liminal stimulus.

stim·u·lus

, pl. stimuli (stim'yū-lŭs, -lī)
That which can elicit or evoke action (response) in a muscle, nerve, gland or other excitable tissue, or cause augmenting action on any function or metabolic process.
[L. a goad]
References in periodicals archive ?
The former group immediately produced robust N400 responses to unrelated stimulus pairs, whereas a gradually emerging N400 response to unrelated stimulus pairs was found in the latter group.
We examined the time windows (50-150 ms after stimulus onset) for the P1 and Nlcomponents in this analysis.
The stimuli presented on test consisted of a copy of the pre-exposed stimulus and another new one chosen in accord with the experimental conditions.
5 Now you need to increase the intensity of the stimulus. a You can do that by decreasing distance to X minus Y; by increasing movement of the stimulus at distance X (a child walking, skipping, or swinging her arms); by increasing number of stimuli (two or three children, instead of one); increasing the visual "threat" (a tall man instead of a short one, or a man with a beard instead of a clean-shaven one); or by increasing volume (if it's a stimulus that makes noise, such as a vacuum cleaner).
In the MS approach described by Windsor, Fiche, and Locke (1994), every presentation array includes every stimulus, which can lead to the student repeatedly selecting only their most preferred item.
Superficially, economic stimulus seems common sense.
Branch campaign manager Enrique Marquez dismissed the Dallas lawyer's association with stimulus money as insignificant.