stimulus

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stimulus

 [stim´u-lus] (L.)
any agent, act, or influence that produces functional or trophic reaction in a receptor or an irritable tissue.
conditioned stimulus a stimulus that acquires the ability to evoke a given response by repeatedly being linked with another stimulus that naturally evokes that response; see also conditioning.
depolarizing stimulus a stimulus that lowers the resting potential, making the inside of a fiber less negative. In cardiac fibers this means bringing the resting potential from −90 mV to −70 mV.
discriminative stimulus a stimulus associated with reinforcement, which exerts control over a given type of behavior; the subject must discriminate between closely related stimuli and respond positively only with this particular stimulus.
eliciting stimulus any stimulus, conditioned or unconditioned, that elicits a response.
threshold stimulus a stimulus that is just strong enough to elicit a response.
unconditioned stimulus any stimulus that naturally evokes a specific response; see also conditioning.

stim·u·lus

, pl.

stim·u·li

(stim'yū-lŭs, -lī),
1. A stimulant.
2. That which can elicit or evoke action (response) in a muscle, nerve, gland or other excitable tissue, or cause an augmenting action upon any function or metabolic process.
[L. a goad]

stimulus

(stĭm′yə-ləs)
n. pl. stimu·li (-lī′)
1. Something causing or regarded as causing a response.
2. An agent, action, or condition that elicits or accelerates a physiological or psychological activity or response.

stim·u·lus

, pl. stimuli (stim'yū-lŭs, -lī)
1. A stimulant.
2. That which can elicit or evoke action (response) in a muscle, nerve, gland or other excitable tissue, or cause an augmenting action on any function or metabolic process.
[L. a goad]

stimulus

Anything that causes a response, either in an excitable tissue or in an organism.

stimulus

any detectable change in the environment (internal or external) of an organism which is capable of activating a receptor and thus producing a RESPONSE in the whole organism or parts of it.

Stimulus

A factor capable of eliciting a response in a nerve.
Mentioned in: Pain, Pain Management

stimulus 

Any agent or environmental change that provokes a response. Plural: stimuli. See action potential.
adequate stimulus A stimulus of sufficient intensity and of appropriate nature to provoke a response in a given receptor. Visible light is the adequate stimulus for the eye, but pressure on the eye that may nevertheless produce a response (called a phosphene) is an inadequate stimulus.
inadequate stimulus 
See adequate stimulus.
liminal stimulus A stimulus of an intensity such that it just provokes a response that is at threshold. Syn. threshold stimulus.
threshold stimulus See liminal stimulus.

stim·u·lus

, pl. stimuli (stim'yū-lŭs, -lī)
That which can elicit or evoke action (response) in a muscle, nerve, gland or other excitable tissue, or cause augmenting action on any function or metabolic process.
[L. a goad]
References in periodicals archive ?
(2009), arbitrary relations between stimuli were established using MTS training in healthy volunteers.
In certain types of probe (Type 4 probes), the undefined sample stimulus from the exclusion probe is dictated again and the child is exposed to the comparison stimuli previously selected in the exclusion probe, a second undefined stimulus and mask.
Since we postulated premier expression as the initial emotional output, it was necessary to conducted a detailed checking on how the muscle activities changed during the first 300ms after stimuli onset.
Both previous studies employed protocols involving the delivery of five stimuli per cranial site.
(2006), in which stimulus control was attributed to intra- and interdimensional differences between stimuli during [t.sub.D] and [t.sup.[DELTA] subcycles.
Reading with understanding is evaluated based on the building of conditional and equivalent relationships network, while generalized reading (here referred to as recombinative) is evidenced in tests with stimuli formed by new combinations of elements of stimuli taught (de Souza, Hanna, Albuquerque & Hubner, 2014).
The multiple-stimulus (MS) and multiple-stimulus without replacement (MSWO) assessment procedures require students to select one of many stimuli presented in an array (Hagopian et al., 2004).
The stimuli were presented in a random order, with the constraint that each 1-back-and-current luminance pair was presented with an equal frequency within a block.
The stimuli (boxes) were placed on wooden stands 40 cm in height so that the gull was unable to see the box's contents.
Non-smoking carriers of the risk gene, however, did not process stimuli much worse.