stigmatize

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stigmatize

(stĭg′mə-tīz′)
tr.v. stigma·tized, stigma·tizing, stigma·tizes
1. To characterize or brand as disgraceful or ignominious.
2. To mark with stigmata or a stigma.
3. To cause stigmata to appear on.

stig′ma·ti·za′tion (-tĭ-zā′shən) n.
stig′ma·tiz′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
As such, it is worthwhile to investigate stigmatizing practice in media discourse (Van Brakel, 2006).
The first step in stigmatizing is the achievement of social stratification through "marking" certain children.
It relates because no matter how much we come to expect it, stigmatizing behavior can still be a surprise.
Women, however, had sharply elevated odds of having been tested for HIV if they held any stigmatizing attitude (odds ratio, 3.
In examining Somali immigrants in Toronto, Kusow (2004) demonstrated how they were able to counter the stigma of being "Black" by not only disavowing their own stigma but also by stigmatizing those who stigmatize them.
Framing also explains how the media can play a positive role in discussing and advocating against the use of stigmatizing language.
The inappropriate response exhibited most frequently by the participant was socially stigmatizing ambulation.
In addition, we as a profession need to examine ourselves and our own stigmatizing beliefs so that we can respect the wishes and honor the needs of clients with mental illness.
Duval, Duval, & Mulilis, 1992), especially it seems if the person also attributes responsibility to their stigmatizing differences.
Vossius and Christian Thomasius come in for special consideration here, as do a number of others, including Brucker, who, despite stigmatizing late ancient eclecticism in his work, is happily eclectic himself, explicitly paying attention to external as well as internal dimensions of the history of philosophy.
The team monitored stigmatizing ideas and behaviors in the general population and the media, particularly toward Asian Americans, who were disproportionately reporting fear, stigmatization, and discrimination compared to the general public.
All psychiatric disorders remain highly stigmatizing for many people, as bona fide evidence of brain abnormalities is yet to be provided in most cases.