stigmatize

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Related to stigmatised: stigmatized

stigmatize

(stĭg′mə-tīz′)
tr.v. stigma·tized, stigma·tizing, stigma·tizes
1. To characterize or brand as disgraceful or ignominious.
2. To mark with stigmata or a stigma.
3. To cause stigmata to appear on.

stig′ma·ti·za′tion (-tĭ-zā′shən) n.
stig′ma·tiz′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
'It hurts so much to be stigmatised by those you thought knew better,' he stated.
Injecting drug users: A stigmatised and stigmatising population.
"It's high time runaway dads were stigmatised, and the full force of shame was heaped upon them," he said.
Mr Cameron said: "It's high time runaway dads were stigmatised, and the full force of shame was heaped upon them.
Put simply, we need to understand the everyday life worlds within which people stigmatise and are stigmatised, because, contrary to how stigma might be presented as a constant, it is not something uniformly applied to leprosy affected people across different contexts.
Ms Blears denied that targeting these children meant they were being stigmatised or unfairly singled out.
``By abolishing them we are signalling that our children should be respected, not stigmatised, and by lifting this bureaucratic burden setting our teachers free to teach.''
Asylum seekers would not be stigmatised by voucher and dispersal schemes, he argued.
Key Populations Manager at the National Aids/STD Control Programme, Helgar Musyoki, said victims are often stigmatised by the community because of their over-dependence on a substance they are abusing and that their family does not want to associate it.
Researchers examined "stigmatised" characteristics - being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), or having a history of poverty or mental or physical illness.
Desmond Hudson said criticism over the move stigmatised the legal aid system and was "disappointing and unhelpful".
But the result of widening the categories of people who could be treated against their will could lead to the entire service being stigmatised, the committee was told.