stigma


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stigma

 [stig´mah]
1. any mental or physical mark or peculiarity which aids in the identification or in the diagnosis of a condition.
2. a mark, spot, or pore on the surface of an organ or organism.
4. in botany, the uppermost part of a pistil, which secretes a moist, sticky substance to trap and hold the pollen that reaches it.
5. an eyespot of chromatophore-bearing protozoa, such as certain euglenoids, comprising a dark pigmented mass that functions in light detection by shielding the photoreceptor cells from specific wavelengths.
6. a distinguishing personal trait that is perceived as or actually is physically, socially, or psychologically disadvantageous.
7. in the plural, gill slits around the pharynx in urochordates, through which pass respiratory and feeding currents.
8. in the plural, purpuric or hemorrhagic lesions of the hands and/or feet, which resemble crucifixion wounds. adj., adj stigmat´ic, stig´mal.
follicular stigma a spot on the surface of an ovary where the vesicular ovarian follicle will rupture and permit passage of the ovum during ovulation. Called also macula folliculi.

stig·ma

, pl.

stig·mas

,

stig·ma·ta

(stig'mă, -mă-tă), Avoid the mispronunciation stigma'ta of the plural form.
1. Visible evidence of a disease.
2. Synonym(s): follicular stigma
3. Any spot or blemish on the skin.
4. A bleeding spot on the skin, which is considered a manifestation of conversion hysteria.
5. The orange-pigmented eyespot of certain chlorophyll-bearing protozoa (for example, Euglena viridis); filters light by absorbing certain wavelengths.
6. A mark of shame or discredit.
[G. a mark. fr. stizō, to prick]

stigma

(stĭg′mə)
n. pl. stigmas or stigmata (stĭg-mä′tə, -măt′ə, stĭg′mə-)
1. An association of disgrace or public disapproval with something, such as an action or condition: "Depression ... has become easier to diagnose, and seeking treatment does not carry the stigma it once did" (Greg Critser).
2. Medicine
a. A visible indicator of disease.
b. A small bodily mark, especially a birthmark or scar, that is congenital or indicative of a condition or disease.
3. Psychology A bleeding spot on the skin considered to be a manifestation of conversion reaction.
4. stigmata Christianity Bodily marks, sores, or sensations of pain corresponding in location to the crucifixion wounds of Jesus, believed to be given as divine recognition of devotion.
5. Botany The apex of the pistil of a flower, on which pollen grains are deposited and germinate.
6. Biology A small mark, spot, or pore, such as the respiratory spiracle of an insect or an eyespot in certain protists.
7. Archaic A mark burned into the skin as a visible identifier of a person as a criminal or slave; a brand.

stig′mal adj.

stigma

 A sign, mark, feature, indicator of something, which generally has a negative connotation

stig·ma

, pl. stigmata (stig'mă, -mă-tă)
1. Visible evidence of a disease.
2. Synonym(s): follicular stigma.
3. Any spot or blemish on the skin.
4. A bleeding spot on the skin, which is considered a manifestation of conversion hysteria.
5. The orange-pigmented eyespot of certain chlorophyll-bearing protozoa, such as Euglena viridis, which serves as a light filter by absorbing certain wavelengths.
6. A mark of shame or discredit.
[G. a mark. fr. stizō, to prick]

stigma

the upper part of the pistil of a flower on which pollen is deposited. The stigmatic surface secretes a sugary solution which aids germination of the pollen grain, unless a SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY mechanism is operating.

stig·ma

, pl. stigmata (stig'mă, -mă-tă)
1. Visible evidence of a disease.
2. Any spot or blemish on skin.
[G. a mark. fr. stizō, to prick]

Patient discussion about stigma

Q. Should I tell people about it? After a long time of visits to numerous doctors, psychiatrists, speech therapist and others, we were told that our child has autism. We are in a dilemma- should we tell others about it? Will it be better for him or will it put a stigma on him and on his borhters? Don’t get me wrong- we love him more than anything no matter what he has, but we are just not sure how people would react to this news. What would you do?

A. I believe you should do what feels right to you- if at first you would rather tell just your close family members or friends, that is perfectly fine. With time, when your son is older or when you feel more comfortable with the idea of his autism, you can decide to tell everyone else. I don't think nowadays there's any stigma about autistic children, and people understand their needs better than in the past. However, you must be prepared to handle all sorts of people, some of whom may express false opinions about autism.

More discussions about stigma
References in periodicals archive ?
'Dementia is one of the most significant global health and social care crises in the 21st century, with someone developing it every three seconds, but the stigma that surrounds it, and a lack of available treatments, means people delay talking about it and delay seeking advice and support, losing valuable time.
Men who experienced weight stigma were more likely to binge eat, and men who internalized weight stigma had lower self-rated health, the findings showed.
Together we can put an end to period poverty and stigma once and for all.
Results showed that almost two-thirds of the participants reported experiencing weight stigma at least once in their life, and almost half reported experiencing these events when they were children or teens.
Burgener et al (12) reported that personal stigma impacted functioning and quality of life in PwD.
To study the relation of stigma with mental health issues, linear regression analysis were used.
Number of recent researches reported the significant negative relationship between internalized stigma of mental illness and quality of life and self-esteem.10-13
Scoring was based on the four subscales of the HIV stigma scale (personalized stigma, disclosure, negative self-image and public attitudes) (13).
Sociologists also use Goffman's definition as a starting point, but they emphasize the social and contextual determinants of stigma. Alonzo and Reynolds (1995) argue that "the stigmatized are a category of people who are pejoratively regarded by the broader society and who are devalued, shunned, or otherwise lessened in their life chances and in access to the humanizing benefit of free and unfettered social intercourse" (p.
And he said: "The work they do at Chasing the Stigma isn't just incredible, it's essential.
The questionnaire packet contained a basic demographic survey and measures of stigma toward individuals who have SUDs and individuals in recovery from SUDs.
Stigma and discrimination are societal barriers that undermine improved public health interventions because they prevent people from seeking healthcare and disclosing their health status.According to news release, the initiative, which is being undertaken by Anti-AIDS Media Network or AAMIN, seeks to improve collaboration between media and civil society organizations in ensuring that key populations, sexual minority groups and marginalized people have access to healthcare services without stigmatization.