stiff-person syndrome

stiff-person syndrome

(stĭf′pûr′sən)
n.
An adult-onset neurological disorder characterized by muscle spasms and progressive muscle stiffness.

stiff-per·son syn·drome

(stif'pĕr-sŏn sin'drōm)
A rare disorder manifested clinically by the continuous isometric contraction of many of the somatic muscles; contractions are usually forceful and painful and most frequently involve the trunk musculature, although limb muscles may be involved. This is an autoimmune disease, with circulating antibodies against the GABA-synthesizing enzyme and glutamic acid decarboxylase, among other types of antibodies present.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stiff-Person Syndrome afflicts twice as many women as men and is often misdiagnosed as a range of conditions, including Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis.
The clinical spectrum of anti- GAD antibody-positive patients with stiff-person syndrome.
They discuss the pretherapeutic history of botulinum neurotoxin, the history of its clinical development, its pharmacology and immunological properties, and treatments for cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, oromandibular dystonia, laryngeal muscle hyperactivity syndromes, otorhinolaryngological conditions, hemifacial spasm, spasticity, spastic infantile cerebral palsy, tic disorders, essential hand and head tremor, stiff-person syndrome, ophthalmological applications, cosmetic uses, hyperhidrosis, ischemic digits, neuropathic pain, headaches, musculoskeletal pain and arthritis, plantar fasciitis, low-back pain, piriformis syndrome, the gastrointestinal tract, and urological disorders.
Rigidity and spasms from autoimmune encephalomyopathies: Stiff-person syndrome.
Her one-in-a-million disorder - called stiff-person syndrome - leaves her body frozen and an attack could be fatal.
The glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody test for stiff-person syndrome was negative, as were serologic tests for Lyme disease, WNV, and syphilis.
Rakocevic G, Raju R, Dalakas MC Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with stiff-person syndrome.
CHICAGO -- Intravenous immunoglobulin was safe and effective for treating certain patients with stiff-person syndrome, Dr.
Helen Stephens, aged 50, from Wednesbury, was originally told by doctors she had Stiff-Person Syndrome (SPS) - which means her muscles tear and expand making her swell by four inches.