stick

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stick

Nursing verb To perform a venipuncture

stick

[Shortening of for needlestick]
A colloquial term for puncture, esp. the puncturing of the skin or a blood vessel.

Patient discussion about stick

Q. I was confused, is he really sticking to diet? My friend is following Fixed-menu diet which I didn’t hear before. He told that he is in diet but he is taking some of the food which he likes. I was confused, is he really sticking to diet?

A. Of course, your friend may be under diet control. I will tell you what fixed menu diet means? A fixed-menu diet provides a list of all the foods you will eat. The merits of this kind of diet are that it can be easy to follow because the foods are selected for you. However the demerit of this type of diet is that you get only few varieties of food which will make the diet boring and it will be hard to follow. If you start with a fixed-menu diet, it is easy to follow.

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References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, fluctuations in volatile prices should not so dominate the index that, to keep it stable on average, stickily priced goods must suffer deflationary or inflationary pressure on their production.
The pathology scenes again leave little to the imagination, with a victim's entire brain being placed stickily onto a weighing scale and blood all over the shop.
The physical details are always vivid; we seem to witness the stages of bodily change, as in those time-lapse photographs where we watch a butterfly stickily extricating itself from its chrysalis before spreading its wings.
Henrietta Knight's people's champion jumped stickily most of the way and was outgunned up the straight by French challenger Jair du Cochet.
Each step, as she pulled it up stickily, was laborious.
Let us sum up by counting the ways: the narrative eye is subjective-objective; the world that it sees is real-but-unreal; every moment is both now and then, and place is always here-over-there; the object is stickily present-but-absent, me-not-me, being-nothing; interpretive options are optionless options that suspend us between incommensurate explanations; the content of the book is a mode that ruins the visual access to content itself; and derangement--lastly--is everywhere-nowhere, a generalization of disturbed particularity that's indistinguishable from a narrative vision which at least pretends to objective apprehension.