sternum

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Related to sternums: breastbone, sternal

sternum

 [ster´num]
a plate of bone forming the middle of the anterior wall of the thorax and articulating with the clavicles and the cartilages of the first seven ribs. It consists of three parts, the manubrium, the body, and the xiphoid process.
From Dorland's, 2000.

ster·num

, gen.

ster·ni

, pl.

ster·na

(ster'nŭm, -nī, -nă), [TA]
A long flat bone, articulating with the cartilages of the first seven ribs and with the clavicle, forming the middle part of the anterior wall of the thorax; it consists of three portions: the corpus or body, the manubrium, and the xiphoid process.
Synonym(s): breast bone
[Mod. L. fr. G. sternon, the chest]

sternum

/ster·num/ (ster´num) [L.] a longitudinal unpaired plate of bone forming the middle of the anterior wall of the thorax, articulating above with the clavicles and along its sides with the cartilages of the first seven ribs. Its three parts are the manubrium, body, and xiphoid process.

sternum

(stûr′nəm)
n. pl. ster·nums or ster·na (-nə)
1. A long flat bone in most vertebrates that is situated along the ventral midline of the thorax and articulates with the ribs. The manubrium of the sternum articulates with the clavicles in humans and certain other vertebrates. Also called breastbone.
2. The ventral portion of a body segment of an arthropod.

sternum

[stur′nəm]
Etymology: Gk, sternon
the elongated flattened bone forming the middle part of the thorax. It supports the clavicles; articulates directly with the first seven pairs of ribs; and comprises the manubrium, the gladiolus (body), and the xiphoid process. It is composed of highly vascular tissue covered by a thin layer of bone.
enlarge picture
Sternum

ster·num

, pl. sterna (stĕr'nŭm, -nă) [TA]
A long, flat bone, articulating with the cartilages of the first seven ribs and with the clavicle, which forms the middle part of the anterior wall of the thorax; it consists of three portions: the corpus or body, the manubrium, and the xiphoid process.
Synonym(s): breast bone.
[Mod. L. fr. G. sternon, the chest]

sternum

(stĕr′nŭm) [L.]
Enlarge picture
STERNUM
The narrow, flat bone in the median line of the thorax in front. It consists of three portions: the manubrium, the body or gladiolus, and the ensiform or xiphoid process. See: illustration

cleft sternum

A congenital fissure of the sternum.

sternum

The breastbone.

sternum

the breastbone that occurs in the ventral region of the chest and to which, in flying birds where the bone is keel-shaped, are attached the pectoral muscles associated with flight. Anteriorly it is connected to the shoulder girdle, and the ventral ends of the ribs are attached along its length.

Sternum

Also referred to as the breast bone, this is the long flat bone in the middle of the chest.
Mentioned in: Chest X Ray

ster·num

, pl. sterna (stĕr'nŭm, -nă) [TA]
A long, flat bone, articulating with the cartilages of the first seven ribs and with the clavicle, which forms the middle part of the anterior wall of the thorax.
Synonym(s): breast bone.
[Mod. L. fr. G. sternon, the chest]

sternum,

n the elongated, flattened bone forming the middle portion of the thorax. It supports the clavicles and articulates directly with the first seven pairs of ribs.

sternum

the breastbone, a median segmented skeletal structure made up of several elements or sternebrae, often with a considerable portion remaining cartilaginous into adulthood. It articulates with the cartilages of the sternal ribs and clavicles when large. It has three parts, the manubrium, the body and the xiphoid process, and consists of vascular, spongy bone covered with a thin layer of compact bone. In ruminants it has a flat ventral surface, while in horses it bears a keel (carina). It is especially well developed, as a nonsegmented keeled bone, in flying birds.

inherited short sternum
in the North Country Cheviot breed; characterized by a heavy mortality in newborn lambs resulting from rupture of the liver; the latter thought to occur because of the exposed position of the liver as a result of the absence of the sternum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Growth disturbance of the sternum and pectus deformities: imaging studies and clinical correlation.
Imaging appearances of the sternum and sternoclavicular joints.
The sternum of second patient with mediastinitis was not closed by wiring and left to secondary heeling.
Various methods of DSC have been used, including maintaining the sternum open with a self-retaining retractor (6), mediastinal packing (7), Steridrape (3M Health Care, StPaul, MN) film coverage (8), silicone membrane (9) and primary skin closure (10,11).
We preferred to leave sternum open in patients with bleeding due to high risk of tamponade and the results were satisfactory in these patients.
We did not closed sternum by wiring in a patient with mediastinitis and left him to secondary heeling.