sternum


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sternum

 [ster´num]
a plate of bone forming the middle of the anterior wall of the thorax and articulating with the clavicles and the cartilages of the first seven ribs. It consists of three parts, the manubrium, the body, and the xiphoid process.
From Dorland's, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ster·num

, gen.

ster·ni

, pl.

ster·na

(ster'nŭm, -nī, -nă), [TA]
A long flat bone, articulating with the cartilages of the first seven ribs and with the clavicle, forming the middle part of the anterior wall of the thorax; it consists of three portions: the corpus or body, the manubrium, and the xiphoid process.
Synonym(s): breast bone
[Mod. L. fr. G. sternon, the chest]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sternum

(stûr′nəm)
n. pl. ster·nums or ster·na (-nə)
1. A long flat bone in most vertebrates that is situated along the ventral midline of the thorax and articulates with the ribs. The manubrium of the sternum articulates with the clavicles in humans and certain other vertebrates. Also called breastbone.
2. The ventral portion of a body segment of an arthropod.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ster·num

, pl. sterna (stĕr'nŭm, -nă) [TA]
A long, flat bone, articulating with the cartilages of the first seven ribs and with the clavicle, which forms the middle part of the anterior wall of the thorax; it consists of three portions: the corpus or body, the manubrium, and the xiphoid process.
Synonym(s): breast bone.
[Mod. L. fr. G. sternon, the chest]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sternum

(stĕr′nŭm) [L.]
Enlarge picture
STERNUM
The narrow, flat bone in the median line of the thorax in front. It consists of three portions: the manubrium, the body or gladiolus, and the ensiform or xiphoid process. See: illustration

cleft sternum

A congenital fissure of the sternum.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

sternum

The breastbone.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

sternum

the breastbone that occurs in the ventral region of the chest and to which, in flying birds where the bone is keel-shaped, are attached the pectoral muscles associated with flight. Anteriorly it is connected to the shoulder girdle, and the ventral ends of the ribs are attached along its length.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Sternum

Also referred to as the breast bone, this is the long flat bone in the middle of the chest.
Mentioned in: Chest X Ray
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ster·num

, pl. sterna (stĕr'nŭm, -nă) [TA]
A long, flat bone, articulating with the cartilages of the first seven ribs and with the clavicle, which forms the middle part of the anterior wall of the thorax.
Synonym(s): breast bone.
[Mod. L. fr. G. sternon, the chest]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
* Revealed a large relatively homogeneous soft tissue echogenic mass around the sternum.
Fracture of sternum in direct impact is one of the causes of haemothorax and injuries to heart and pericardium.
"I didn't have any problems in the run up to the race, but we made a setup breakthrough in the morning warm up so I went in to the race with more pace and even more pressure on the recently healed muscles around my sternum.
Local examination revealed a large solitary lesion over the sternum of about 2.5x2.5 cm.
The furcula is fused and articulates with the cranial and ventral aspect of the sternum. The articulation of the coracoids with the sternum is asymmetric, with the right side more cranial than the left.
In this case, chest wall resection involved resecting the ribs, sternum, costal cartilages and surrounding soft tissues.
Layla could have a custom-made chest brace, which would gently press against her sternum, to help reshape her chest as she grows.
A physical examination revealed tenderness over the junction of the middle and distal third of the manubrium sternum in the midline of the body.
The back of the sternum could be adherent to the omentum or stomach wall anteriorly.
The typical symptom of pectus excavatum was sunken sternum. The symptom can lead to respiratory and circulatory system dysfunction, palpitation, shortness of breath after fatigue, exercise intolerance, and other diseases [2, 3].
Symmastia is defined as the medial confluence of both breasts or unification of the breasts by soft tissue on the sternum rendering them inseparable.
Osprey have used their BioStretch body-wrap harness and body-belt, as well as dual sternum straps to ensure that the pack stays still while you run.