sternum


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sternum

 [ster´num]
a plate of bone forming the middle of the anterior wall of the thorax and articulating with the clavicles and the cartilages of the first seven ribs. It consists of three parts, the manubrium, the body, and the xiphoid process.
From Dorland's, 2000.

ster·num

, gen.

ster·ni

, pl.

ster·na

(ster'nŭm, -nī, -nă), [TA]
A long flat bone, articulating with the cartilages of the first seven ribs and with the clavicle, forming the middle part of the anterior wall of the thorax; it consists of three portions: the corpus or body, the manubrium, and the xiphoid process.
Synonym(s): breast bone
[Mod. L. fr. G. sternon, the chest]

sternum

/ster·num/ (ster´num) [L.] a longitudinal unpaired plate of bone forming the middle of the anterior wall of the thorax, articulating above with the clavicles and along its sides with the cartilages of the first seven ribs. Its three parts are the manubrium, body, and xiphoid process.

sternum

(stûr′nəm)
n. pl. ster·nums or ster·na (-nə)
1. A long flat bone in most vertebrates that is situated along the ventral midline of the thorax and articulates with the ribs. The manubrium of the sternum articulates with the clavicles in humans and certain other vertebrates. Also called breastbone.
2. The ventral portion of a body segment of an arthropod.

sternum

[stur′nəm]
Etymology: Gk, sternon
the elongated flattened bone forming the middle part of the thorax. It supports the clavicles; articulates directly with the first seven pairs of ribs; and comprises the manubrium, the gladiolus (body), and the xiphoid process. It is composed of highly vascular tissue covered by a thin layer of bone.
enlarge picture
Sternum

ster·num

, pl. sterna (stĕr'nŭm, -nă) [TA]
A long, flat bone, articulating with the cartilages of the first seven ribs and with the clavicle, which forms the middle part of the anterior wall of the thorax; it consists of three portions: the corpus or body, the manubrium, and the xiphoid process.
Synonym(s): breast bone.
[Mod. L. fr. G. sternon, the chest]

sternum

(stĕr′nŭm) [L.]
Enlarge picture
STERNUM
The narrow, flat bone in the median line of the thorax in front. It consists of three portions: the manubrium, the body or gladiolus, and the ensiform or xiphoid process. See: illustration

cleft sternum

A congenital fissure of the sternum.

sternum

The breastbone.

sternum

the breastbone that occurs in the ventral region of the chest and to which, in flying birds where the bone is keel-shaped, are attached the pectoral muscles associated with flight. Anteriorly it is connected to the shoulder girdle, and the ventral ends of the ribs are attached along its length.

Sternum

Also referred to as the breast bone, this is the long flat bone in the middle of the chest.
Mentioned in: Chest X Ray

ster·num

, pl. sterna (stĕr'nŭm, -nă) [TA]
A long, flat bone, articulating with the cartilages of the first seven ribs and with the clavicle, which forms the middle part of the anterior wall of the thorax.
Synonym(s): breast bone.
[Mod. L. fr. G. sternon, the chest]

sternum,

n the elongated, flattened bone forming the middle portion of the thorax. It supports the clavicles and articulates directly with the first seven pairs of ribs.

sternum

the breastbone, a median segmented skeletal structure made up of several elements or sternebrae, often with a considerable portion remaining cartilaginous into adulthood. It articulates with the cartilages of the sternal ribs and clavicles when large. It has three parts, the manubrium, the body and the xiphoid process, and consists of vascular, spongy bone covered with a thin layer of compact bone. In ruminants it has a flat ventral surface, while in horses it bears a keel (carina). It is especially well developed, as a nonsegmented keeled bone, in flying birds.

inherited short sternum
in the North Country Cheviot breed; characterized by a heavy mortality in newborn lambs resulting from rupture of the liver; the latter thought to occur because of the exposed position of the liver as a result of the absence of the sternum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transcutaneous bilirubinometer reading from forehead, sternum and pubic symphysis were compared separately with serum bilirubin level.
sup][2],[3] Midline vertical skin incisions over the sternum with lateral extension into the inframammary folds and various local flaps for repair should be avoided.
Additionally, while this cue may result in an elevated sternum, it can restrict the freedom of the middle back and lower back if the student interprets the cue incorrectly.
It appeared to be arising from the posterior aspect of the sternum and the left sterno-clavicular joint.
The sternum was 40mm wide and 11mm deep and is naturally a strong and dense bone so the force required, even with a sharp knife, would be severe.
The scan revealed increased uptake in the body of the sternum, exactly where the pain was located, demonstrating unequal uptake intensity strongly indicative of a stress fracture in the sternum.
Metasomal terga and sterna imbricate; sternum IV with apical margin weakly concave medially; apical margin of sternum V with deep U-shaped apical emargination; sternum VI as in C.
Reinforced stitching, fully-adjustable Sternum Straps and a Hip-Belt all come together on the Treestand Transport System to give archery hunters a quiet, comfortable way to carry their favorite stands.
Lehrbuch der Entomologie), do not describe the prothoracic sternum in Coleoptera.
That, plus a lack of large-muscle attachments on the creature's sternum, suggests that the dinosaur didn't have the power to take off from the ground.
The angle of Louis (sternal angle) represents the prominent border between the sternum and manubrium.