sternal puncture


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Related to sternal puncture: cisternal puncture

puncture

 [pungk´chur]
1. the act of piercing or penetrating with a pointed object.
2. a wound so made.
cisternal puncture see cisternal puncture.
lumbar puncture (spinal puncture) see lumbar puncture.
sternal puncture see sternal puncture.
tracheoesophageal puncture surgical creation of a tracheoesophageal fistula to hold a one-way plastic valve to restore speech after Laryngectomy.

sternal

 [ster´nal]
pertaining to the sternum.
sternal puncture insertion of a hollow needle into the manubrium of the sternum to obtain a sample of bone marrow. The sternum is chosen because of its accessibility and because it is a thin, flat bone. The procedure must be done under surgical asepsis. The clinician anesthetizes the skin and periosteum with a local anesthetic before introducing the sternal needle. The needle is designed with a special guard to prevent penetration beyond the desired depth. When cells are being aspirated into the syringe the patient may experience a sharp pain; otherwise the procedure should not be painful. Samples are examined for abnormal cells, for the proportion of cells in various stages of development, and for the characteristics of the blood cells that predominate. This information is used in conjunction with clinical findings and other tests in diagnosis of blood disorders such as leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and anemia.

ster·nal punc·ture

removal of bone marrow from the manubrium by needle.

sternal puncture

Etymology: Gk, sternon, chest; L, punctura
a diagnostic procedure in which a needle is inserted into the marrow of the sternum to remove bone marrow samples for diagnosis.

ster·nal punc·ture

(stĕr'năl pungk'shŭr)
Removal of bone marrow from the manubrium by needle.

sternal

pertaining to the sternum.

sternal puncture
insertion of a hollow needle into the manubrium of the sternum for the purpose of obtaining a sample of bone marrow. The sternum is chosen because of its accessibility and because it is a flat bone in many species.
sternal recumbency
the animal lies down on its ventral thoracic and abdominal walls, usually with the legs tucked underneath the body; the sagittal plane is vertical and the head is in a vertical plane. Called also dorsal recumbency.