sterilize

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sterilize

 [ster´ĭ-līz]
to subject to sterilization.

ster·il·ize

(ster'ĭl-īz),
To produce sterility.

sterilize

/ster·i·lize/ (ster´ĭ-līz)
1. to render sterile; to free from microorganisms.
2. to render incapable of reproduction.

sterilize

(stĕr′ə-līz′)
tr.v. steril·ized, steril·izing, steril·izes
1. To make free from live bacteria or other microorganisms.
2. To eliminate the ability of a person or animal to produce offspring, as by altering or removing the reproductive organs.
3.
a. To make incapable of bearing fruit or germinating.
b. To render (land) unfruitful.

ster′i·li·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
ster′il·iz′er n.

sterilize

[ster′ilīz]
Etymology: L, sterilis, barren
1 to make powerless to reproduce (infertile), such as by surgery.
2 to destroy all living organisms and viruses in a material.

ster·il·ize

(ster'i-līz)
To produce sterility or asepsis.

sterilize

to subject to sterilization.

Patient discussion about sterilize

Q. Is it good to put alcohol on burns? If I get a burn- should I sterilize it with alcohol to prevent infections?

A. Tiffany is right...best to avoid alcohol. the treatment depends on the severity of the burn. here is a pamphlet about dealing with burns. very helpful!
http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/healthy/firstaid/after-injury/638.html

More discussions about sterilize
References in periodicals archive ?
Bleach based sterilization procedures are usually combined with 70 % ethanol rinse that is also considered a good sterilizing agent for many of the plants for in vitro culture (Aasim et al.
These results are not in confirmatory with earlier reports which have reported sodium hypochlorite and ethanol as good sterilizing agents for cotton seed (Aragao et al.
Many researchers have used these sterilizing agents successfully (Rashid et al.
Hydrogen peroxide solution as sterilizing agent has been reported for plants like Doug-las-fir, wax currant, pines, barley, safflower and cotton with improved germination (Dumroese et al.
The second case supposes that whatever cancels the sterilizing effect in ns also cancels the deleterious fecundity effect on the host, so that [F.
u], diminishes until the sterilizing allele, s, is lost, leaving [P.
One conclusion from this exercise relates to the evolutionary origin of sterilizing Wolbachia.