sterile technique


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sterile

 [ster´il]
1. infertile (see infertility).
sterile technique aseptic technique.

sterile technique

References in periodicals archive ?
Dean told him that there had been a break in sterile technique during the operation.
Sterile technique must be used but that does not require a laminar flow hood; we worked in an alcohol swabbed Plexiglas box with one side left open for our hands.
Researchers say that the liver infection can be passed on by re-use of tattooing needles or dye, inadequate sterilization of needles between customers, or breaks in sterile technique.
But if they are not able or willing to stop at this time, I teach them sterile technique that doctors use for injection -- including the use of a sterile syringe.
On the final day we had a discussion about vaginal exams and why, even though they are not necessarily a standard part of a doula's role in labor support, ALACE teaches sterile technique and vaginal exams in its Labor Assistant workshops.
In cases where the clean, nonsterile technique is not appropriate, intermittent catheterization using sterile technique may be covered when the patient:
Since then, the white coat of the physician has come to symbolize sterile technique and antisepsis, and to this day it is synonymous with the scientific basis of medicine.
The statement included special references to lack of adequate anesthesia and analgesia for the baboons, sterile technique and supervision and training of laboratory personnel.
Sterile technique is required for insertion of an indwelling urinary catheter in the hospital setting, but clean technique can be used for intermittent catheterisation in non-acute settings.
It covers fundamentals of theory and practice, the perioperative patient care team, the patient as a unique individual, the perioperative environment, surgical asepsis and sterile technique, surgical instrumentation and equipment, preoperative patient care, pharmacology and anesthesia, intraoperative patient care, surgical site management, perianethesia and postprocedural patient care, and surgical specialties.
It also addresses specific diseases, pathophysiology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, preoperative concerns, medical management, prognosis, anesthesia, surgical anatomy, wound healing, postoperative issues, potential complications, and special age considerations, as well as general principles related to surgical asepsis, sterile technique (with new material on scrubless and waterless surgeon and patient prep solutions), instrumentation and facilities, biomaterials, suturing, homeostasis, preoperative care, antibiotic use and infections, postoperative care (including nutrition), physical rehabilitation, and multimodal analgesic therapy (expanded for this edition).