stereotypy


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stereotypy

 [ster´e-o-ti″pe]
the persistent repetition of senseless acts or words, frequently occurring in disorders such as autistic disorder and schizophrenia; called also stereotypy-habit disorder.

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī'pē),
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements, as in certain forms of schizophrenia.
[stereo- + G. typos, impression, type]

stereotypy

/ster·eo·ty·py/ (ster´e-o-ti″pe) persistent repetition or sameness of acts, ideas, or words.

stereotypy

(stĕr′ē-ə-tī′pē, stîr′-)
n. pl. stereoty·pies
a. Excessive repetition or lack of variation in movements, postures, or patterns of speech, especially when viewed as a symptom of certain developmental or psychiatric disorders.
b. Abnormal, repeated, nonfunctional behavior, such as pacing or chewing, in a captive or domesticated animal.

stereotypy

[ster′ē·ətī′pē]
Etymology: Gk, stereos + typos, mark
the persistent, inappropriate mechanical repetition of actions, body postures, or speech patterns, usually occurring with a lack of variation in thought processes or ideas. It is often seen in patients with schizophrenia. stereotypical, adj.

stereotypy

Neurology A non-goal-directed automatic and/or persistent mechanical repetition of speech or motor activity; a series of repetitive complex movements that simulate motor tics, seen in Pts with hyperactivity, mental retardation, schizophrenia, psychosis.Cf Motor tic.

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī-pē)
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements, as in certain forms of schizophrenia.
[G. stereos, solid + G. typos, impression, type]

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī-pē)
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements.
[G. stereos, solid + G. typos, impression, type]

stereotypy

References in periodicals archive ?
Borehole site stereotypy has been noted in a variety of naticid species, including Lunatia heros (e.
Average interobserver reliability scores were 94% for stereotypy (range: 87-100%), 100% for standing up, and 98% for head up behavior (range: 96-100%).
The early development of stereotypy and self-injury: A review of research methods.
Tweaking specifically refers to stereotypy, which is compulsive, repetitive behavior such as repeatedly disassembling and reassembling (often unsuccessfully) electronic or mechanical equipment (Amera-Chem Inc 2008).
Gulotta, Piazza, Patel, & Layer, 2005; Lyons, Rue, Luiselli, & DiGennaro, 2007), behavioral excesses such as stereotypy (e.
One theory states that stereotypy serves as a competing reinforcer, such that reinforcers provided by stereotypy interfere with reinforcers provided by the external environment.
This behavior has been reported previously as a stereotypy of confined sows (Terlouw et al.
Several behavioral abnormalities associated with FMR-1 KO mice, including those in locomotor activity, stereotypy, and anxiety are also partially ameliorated or eliminated by the PAK transgene.
Citalopram use was significantly more likely to be associated with adverse events, particularly increased energy level, impulsiveness, decreased concentration, hyperactivity, stereotypy, diarrhoea, insomnia and dry skin or pruritis.
oAs I explained earlier, stereotypy is often inevitable in Indian cinema, but I believe it is harmful to stick to stereotypes, so, in aeJodhaa AkbarAE, I tried to maintain a blend of everything and reduce stereotype to the minimum,o he said.
Each of the studies examined noted that the therapies utilizing these drugs resulted in significant clinical ameliorations in hyperactivity/ impulsivity, stereotypy, aggression, self-injury, abnormal sexual behaviours, and/or irritability behaviours that frequently occur in those with an ASD diagnosis.