stereotypy


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stereotypy

 [ster´e-o-ti″pe]
the persistent repetition of senseless acts or words, frequently occurring in disorders such as autistic disorder and schizophrenia; called also stereotypy-habit disorder.

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī'pē),
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements, as in certain forms of schizophrenia.
[stereo- + G. typos, impression, type]

stereotypy

/ster·eo·ty·py/ (ster´e-o-ti″pe) persistent repetition or sameness of acts, ideas, or words.

stereotypy

(stĕr′ē-ə-tī′pē, stîr′-)
n. pl. stereoty·pies
a. Excessive repetition or lack of variation in movements, postures, or patterns of speech, especially when viewed as a symptom of certain developmental or psychiatric disorders.
b. Abnormal, repeated, nonfunctional behavior, such as pacing or chewing, in a captive or domesticated animal.

stereotypy

[ster′ē·ətī′pē]
Etymology: Gk, stereos + typos, mark
the persistent, inappropriate mechanical repetition of actions, body postures, or speech patterns, usually occurring with a lack of variation in thought processes or ideas. It is often seen in patients with schizophrenia. stereotypical, adj.

stereotypy

Neurology A non-goal-directed automatic and/or persistent mechanical repetition of speech or motor activity; a series of repetitive complex movements that simulate motor tics, seen in Pts with hyperactivity, mental retardation, schizophrenia, psychosis.Cf Motor tic.

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī-pē)
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements, as in certain forms of schizophrenia.
[G. stereos, solid + G. typos, impression, type]

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī-pē)
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements.
[G. stereos, solid + G. typos, impression, type]

stereotypy

References in periodicals archive ?
Can't stop, won't stop: Is stereotypy a reliable animal welfare indicator?
Whatever the seizure symptom, its episodicity, clinical context and stereotypy help to identify it as a seizure.
It is particularly relevant that, under the hypothesis that TCVs may impact behavior, there were very few instances of negative behaviors, such as rocking, self-clasping, and stereotypy, reported across the entire infancy period for all groups.
This result was not expected, since it has been reported that the prevalence of stereotypies increases with age (1, 10, 11, 19, 20), partly because once stereotypies are acquired, they are very difficult to eliminate (1) and because horses face stressful situations and other risk factors that could stimulate the development of a stereotypy (3) on a daily basis.
For instance, the presence of music increased stereotypy displayed by a boy with Down syndrome and moderate intellectual disability (Rapp, 2004), and increased disruptive behaviors (ear covering and screaming) displayed by a seven-year-old boy with pervasive developmental disorder (Buckley & Newchok, 2006).
17) In addition, stereotypic behaviours were assessed using the Stereotypy Rating Inventory (SRI).
Stereotypy, self-injury, and related abnormal repetitive behaviors.
While we still deal with our fair share of behaviors and stereotypy, he now speaks in full sentences, has solid eye contact for most exchanges, can read and write simple sight words, engages in pretend play and limited peer play, seeks his family out for enjoyment, and has recently begun to successfully potty train.
Stereotypy I: A review of behavioral assessment and treatment.
The social impairment as detected by blinded investigators did not reach the level of social impairment consistent with autism, but the stereotypy was profound.