stereotypy

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stereotypy

 [ster´e-o-ti″pe]
the persistent repetition of senseless acts or words, frequently occurring in disorders such as autistic disorder and schizophrenia; called also stereotypy-habit disorder.

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī'pē),
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements, as in certain forms of schizophrenia.
[stereo- + G. typos, impression, type]

stereotypy

/ster·eo·ty·py/ (ster´e-o-ti″pe) persistent repetition or sameness of acts, ideas, or words.

stereotypy

(stĕr′ē-ə-tī′pē, stîr′-)
n. pl. stereoty·pies
a. Excessive repetition or lack of variation in movements, postures, or patterns of speech, especially when viewed as a symptom of certain developmental or psychiatric disorders.
b. Abnormal, repeated, nonfunctional behavior, such as pacing or chewing, in a captive or domesticated animal.

stereotypy

[ster′ē·ətī′pē]
Etymology: Gk, stereos + typos, mark
the persistent, inappropriate mechanical repetition of actions, body postures, or speech patterns, usually occurring with a lack of variation in thought processes or ideas. It is often seen in patients with schizophrenia. stereotypical, adj.

stereotypy

Neurology A non-goal-directed automatic and/or persistent mechanical repetition of speech or motor activity; a series of repetitive complex movements that simulate motor tics, seen in Pts with hyperactivity, mental retardation, schizophrenia, psychosis.Cf Motor tic.

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī-pē)
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements, as in certain forms of schizophrenia.
[G. stereos, solid + G. typos, impression, type]

ster·e·o·ty·py

(ster'ē-ō-tī-pē)
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period.
2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements.
[G. stereos, solid + G. typos, impression, type]

stereotypy

References in periodicals archive ?
Classroom observations and staff reports also indicated that Yaffa engaged in frequent stereotypies involving tapping.
No one knows what alterations in brain function are causing the stereotypies, though some stereotypies are thought to involve the basal ganglia, a part of the brain involved in motor function.
The most common abnormal behaviors and stereotypies are also described, as well as injuries and diseases caused by housing and management systems that do not meet the animals' health and welfare needs.
Clinicians grapple with the differences between OCD, obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, and stereotypies, ritualistic behaviors associated with behavioral phenotypes of some genetic disorders, and the presence of autistic spectrum disorders.
Improvements were suggested in irritability and hyperactivity, but not in inappropriate speech, lethargy, or stereotypies, he reported (J.
Studies report these agents can reduce the frequency and intensity of repetitive, ritualized behaviors including motor stereotypies and more classic compulsions.
High-fibre diets for sows: Effects on stereotypies and adjunctive drinking.
Haloperidol, chlorpromazine, and clozapine block the stimulus cues and stereotypies produced by amphetamine but do not antagonize the reduction on the rate of operant response produced by intermediate doses of d-amphetamine (Callahan, Appel, & Cunninghan, 1991; Colpaert, Niemegeers, & Jansen, 1978; Miczek & Yoshimura, 1982; Nielsen & Jepsen, 1985; Tschanz & Rebec, 1988).
BALTIMORE -- Motor stereotypies can affect otherwise normal children at an early age and persist at least through adolescence, but may be amenable to behavioral therapy and some medications, Dr.
The primary features of this disorder include severe deficits in language, play and social skills, as well as frequent engagement in restrictive and repetitive behaviors such as preoccupations with parts of objects, motor stereotypies, or compulsive behaviors (American Psychiatric Association, 1994).
Influences of feeding level and physical restriction on development of stereotypies in sows.
As discussed above, higher-order stereotypies might develop during lag schedules where the variability requirement remains constant, that is, a fixed lag.