stereotypic


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stereotypic

/ster·eo·typ·ic/ (ster″e-o-tip´ik) having a fixed, unvarying form.
References in periodicals archive ?
The child's gender affects parents' causal attributions for their children's performance in gender role stereotypic activities, and that these perceptual biases influence the children's own self-perceptions and activity choices (Eccles and Jacobs, 1990).
Persistence of stereotypic behavior: Examining the effects of external reinforcers.
What is the level of teachers' stereotypic belief (conception) of the sources of adolescent storm and stress?
Increasing interest is emerging regarding the evaluation of currently used enrichment techniques that are alleged to reduce stereotypic behaviors (Swaisgood and Shepherdson, 2005, 2006; Shyne, 2006; Wells, 2009).
If they last more than 4 weeks, are driven, and cause marked dysfunction or significant self-injury, they may even qualify as stereotypic movement disorder.
Modern mass communication research has shown that these mediated "facts" often rely on stereotypes and that, more importantly, long-term exposure to such content can lead to the development of stereotypic memory traces, which, in turn, can influence individuals' thoughts, feelings, and behaviors (Mastro, 2009).
Surprisingly, avatar gender didn't influence judgments in typical gender stereotypic directions.
Autistic Disorders (ADs) are neuro-developmental disorders in the category of pervasive developmental disorders chiefly described by three main deficits: 1) deviant communication, 2) impaired reciprocal social interaction, and 3) limited, repetitive and stereotypic patterns of behaviors or interests.
In Chapter 6, the authors explore themes of the local/cultural by pointing to the ways in which gaming is a global phenomenon, not simply confined to stereotypic demographics.
When, directly or indirectly, it projects the negative stereotypic of the "Jew" onto the Jewish state.
Children who are visually impaired (that is, those who are blind or have low vision) commonly engage in stereotypic behaviors such as rocking and repetitive hand movements to gain sensory stimulation produced by the behavior (Gourgey, 1998; Rapp, 2004; Warren, 1984).