stereotyped


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stereotyped

(stĕr′ē-ə-tīpt′, stîr′-)
adj.
Of or relating to stereotypy: stereotyped behavior.
References in classic literature ?
She would not hand him a stereotyped rejection slip, nor would she inform him that lack of preference for his work did not necessarily imply lack of merit in his work.
Crystallized by cooling, they have stereotyped that aspect which the moon formerly presented when under the Plutonian forces.
Occasionally supplications are long, drawn-out and drawling, stereotyped and mechanical--they are purely begging supplications.
asked Philip coldly, with the stereotyped phrase used in the out-patients' room.
The director didn't make the images up; they're there, but in putting that one slice of gay life into the massest of mass media--the amoral promiscuity, the drug and alcohol abuse, the stereotyped flamboyance and campiness, the bitchy queeniness and flimsy values--something very dangerous happens even above and beyond reinforcing right-wingers' negative feelings about homosexuals.
Similarly, the dignity and self-esteem of native Americans would most certainly be improved if the use of stereotyped names, images, and mascots ceased.
Hollywood has scapegoated and stereotyped them in the past, and it's shameful.
There is a well-documented tendency for an occupation that has been dominated by one sex to be stereotyped as being better suited to the skills and characteristics of the persons of that sex (e.
The book's 34 essays - each written by a different author - give a broad, if uneven look at the way in which members of ethnic groups, gender groups, age groups, and sexual orientation groups, to name just a few, have been stereotyped in images published in newspapers and magazines, broadcast on television, and shown in motion pictures.
Warriors in an ancient society, for instance, might reasonably have been stereotyped as aggressive and unemotional, while storytellers and musicians were accurately tagged as expressive and friendly.
Because of this need for flexibility, women frequently find themselves blocked in their career path and stereotyped as lacking the commitment to the company that men are perceived to have.
The first is the way that feminism, through Hillary, is stereotyped as some monolithic fringe movement completely out of the American ideological mainstream.