stepped care


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stepped care

care adjusted in stages (steps) according to the failure or lack of effect of lower intensity interventions.
See also: stratified care.
Synonym(s): step care

stepped care

Treatment that follows a predetermined or algorithmic sequence. The simplest, most affordable, or most broadly effective treatment regimen is used first. If that fails or causes side effects, other options are employed one after another until an endpoint is reached.
See also: care
References in periodicals archive ?
regular review of the caseloads of practitioners providing low intensity interventions within IAPT stepped care services.
The VHA's National Pain Management Strategy: Implementing the stepped care model.
A randomized stepped care intervention trial targeting posttraumatic stress disorder for surgically hospitalized injury survivors.
3) Stepped care has been adopted by many third-party payers who require conservative care before reimbursing for injections, and treatment with injections before reimbursing for surgery.
Evaluation of a telephone-based stepped care intervention for alcohol-related disorders: A randomized clinical trial.
The motivated stepped care treatment model uses a four-step intervention strategy (figure).
Stepped care for alcohol problems: An efficient method for planning and delivering clinical services.
In a stepped care approach to treatment, examining clinical significance can be particularly useful because it signals when clients have achieved clinically significant change in their status and no longer require treatment, or whether a step up in treatment is needed.
The protocol was based on the World Health Organization analgesic ladder and the Beating osteoARThritis strategy for stepped care in hip and knee OA (Arthritis Care Res.
In the stepped care model, it can be offered as the least invasive and lowest intensity intervention which can be 'stepped up' if necessary.
They conducted the Stepped Care for Affective Disorders and Musculoskeletal Pain (SCAMP) study to determine whether two types of treatment--pharmacologic and behavioral--would prove synergistic in treating the comorbid conditions.
Potential intervention categories included cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), trauma-focused CBT, traumafocused group CBT, nontrauma-focused group CBT, stress management/relaxation, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, other psychological interventions, education, provision of information, stepped care, and interventions aimed at enhancing positive coping skills and improving overall well-being.