step length

step length

When an individual is walking, the distance between the first point of contact of a limb with the ground and the first point of contact of the limb on the opposite side, often but not always the distance from the back of one heel strike to the back of the other.

step length

the distance between the position (e.g. heel contact) of one foot and the next similar position of the opposite foot in gait (walking or running). May also include other support devices such as crutches. May be different for each foot. May also be positive, negative ('dragging' one foot so that it never reaches the other) or zero (when one foot is advanced only to the position beside the other foot). Usually measured in metres.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, basic spatiotemporal gait parameters including the step length, stance time, and cadence were automatically measured from these two phases.
Participants were excluded if they had Parkinson's disease or other conditions resulting in inconsistent step length from step to step, which could lead to an inability to calibrate the StepWatch.
One case study found that exposure to WBV resulted in a significant increase in walking velocity, cadence and step length, indicating an increase in overall mobility (19).
The period required for one walking step is assumed as 5 s with a step length 20 cm.
The forward and vertical acceleration is needed for pedometer and horizontal angular (rotational) velocity and step length is needed for dead reckoning system.
Results obtained by data analysis of the gait characteristics showed that velocity, cadence, step length, and stride length were significantly reduced and step time was significantly increased when using a cellular phone as compared with the control condition.
Linear kinematics of paretic and non-paretic limb step length and paretic limb foot clearance during mid swing; and angular kinematics of sagittal plane hip, knee and ankle joint angles and frontal plane pelvic level, hip abduction and trunk lateral flexion were measured.
In our previous work (see [5, 6, 8, 9]) we showed that the use of a simple numerical scheme with fixed step length yields a finite dimensional solution map operator for the numerical approximation of a single term delay equation.
To measure functional capacity, researchers checked parameters, such as gait speed, step length, standup time from a seated position and dressing in a coat.
Third step frequency and step length will show small levels of association with sprint performance, with variables such as stance time and flight time having a lesser level of association.
The discrete points of independent variable can be fixed before and also can select different step length along with the different nodes.
Finally, qualitative observation of strategies for walking downhill showed important variations among subjects: some were able to control their descent increasing knee peak moment like the control group, some reduced gait speed and step length, and others swept along the ramp.