stent


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Related to stent: angioplasty

stent

 [stent]
1. a mold for keeping a skin graft in place, made of Stent's mass or some acrylic or dental compound.
2. by extension, a device or mold of a suitable material used to provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed. Intravascular stents maintain patency by scaffolding a vessel wall, thus preserving optimal blood flow. Today, they are being used to treat not only coronary artery disease but also problems in the peripheral vascular system, bile ducts and biliary tree, kidney, urinary tract, trachea, and bronchi. A stent is delivered by an angioplasty balloon; when expanded, it forms a fretwork within the lumen and endothelializes over time. Patients receiving endovascular stents are kept on anticoagulants while in the hospital and usually for one to three months after discharge.
Expanded intraluminal stent within a vessel. From Dorland's, 2000.

Stent

(stent),
Charles R., 19th-century English dentist. See: stent, Stent graft.

stent

(stent),
1. A thread, rod, or catheter, lying within the lumen of a tubular structure, used to provide support during or after repair or anastomosis, or to ensure patency of an intact but contracted lumen.
2. The process of placing a stent.
3. Device used to maintain a bodily orifice or cavity during skin grafting.
4. To immobilize a skin graft after placement.

stent

(stent)
1. a device or mold of a suitable material, used to hold a skin graft in place.
2. a slender rodlike or threadlike device used to provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed, or to induce or maintain their patency.

Palmaz stent  an intravascular stent made of rigid wire mesh; it is introduced by a guidewire and expanded into place by a balloon.
pigtail stent  one with a curl near the end like that of a pig's tail to maintain it in place.

stent

(stĕnt)
n.
1. A device used to support a bodily orifice or cavity during skin grafting or to immobilize a skin graft following placement.
2. A short tubular device made of wire mesh or fabric that is placed permanently in an anatomical passage, usually an artery during angioplasty, to keep it open after occlusion.

stent

Etymology: Charles R. Stent, nineteenth-century English dentist
1 a compound used in making dental impressions and medical molds.
2 a mold or device made of stent, used in anchoring skin grafts.
3 a rod or threadlike device for supporting tubular structures during surgical anastomosis or for holding arteries open during angioplasty.
enlarge picture
Coronary artery stent

stent

Cardiology Intracoronary stent An expansile tube positioned in a blood vessel, especially a stenosed coronary artery, to ↑ its diameter, ergo blood flow to the myocardium; stenting of obstructed CABGs results in superior outcomes, larger gain in luminal diameter, ↓ major cardiac events. See Coronary artery bypass graft, Coronary stent, Endovascular stent, Endovascular stent-graft, Harrel Y stent, Horizon temporary stent, INR stent. Cf Balloon angioplasty Medtalk A synthetic tube placed in a tubular structure and intended to maintain that structure's open state. See Biliary stent.

stent

(stent)
1. Device used to maintain a bodily orifice or cavity during skin grafting, or to immobilize a skin graft after placement.
2. Slender thread, rod, or catheter, lying within the lumen of tubular structures, used to provide support during or after their anastomosis, or to assure patency of an intact but contracted lumen.
[C. Stent]

stent

(stent)
[Charles Thomas Stent, Brit. dentist, 1845–1901]
1. Originally, a compound used in making dental molds.
2. Any material or device used to hold tissue in place, to maintain open blood vessels, or to provide a support for a graft or anastomosis while healing is taking place.

airway stent

A tube or catheter used as a scaffold to keep an airway open. It is used, e.g., to maintain the patency of a trachea or bronchus that has collapsed as a result of compression by neighboring tissues.

bare metal stent

A vascular stent made of stainless steel or related materials. It is designed to hold an artery open with simple mechanical support. See: drug-eluting stent

covered stent

A stent whose supportive lattice is coated with biocompatible fabric or plastic, e.g., Dacron, polytetrafluoroethylene, or silicone.

drug-eluting stent

Abbreviation: DES
A stent coated with medications that it releases into surrounding intimal cells. It is designed to keep the lumen of an artery from closing both by holding the artery open and by retarding the growth of the vascular endothelium into the stent. See: bare metal stent

endoluminal stent

A stent placed inside a tubular structure or organ.

endovascular stent

A stent placed inside an artery or a vein.

esophageal stent

A tube inserted into the esophagus to open a stricture.
Enlarge picture
INSERTION OF A CORONARY ARTERY STENT: (A) A balloon catheter with a collapsed stent is advanced to the location of a coronary artery lesion. (B) The balloon is inflated, which expands the stent and compresses the lesion to increase the artery opening. (C) The balloon is then deflated and removed, leaving the expanded stent in place to prevent the artery from closing.
Enlarge picture
INSERTION OF A CORONARY ARTERY STENT: (A) A balloon catheter with a collapsed stent is advanced to the location of a coronary artery lesion. (B) The balloon is inflated, which expands the stent and compresses the lesion to increase the artery opening. (C) The balloon is then deflated and removed, leaving the expanded stent in place to prevent the artery from closing.
Enlarge picture
INSERTION OF A CORONARY ARTERY STENT: (A) A balloon catheter with a collapsed stent is advanced to the location of a coronary artery lesion. (B) The balloon is inflated, which expands the stent and compresses the lesion to increase the artery opening. (C) The balloon is then deflated and removed, leaving the expanded stent in place to prevent the artery from closing.

intraluminal coronary artery stent

A stent made of an inert material, usually metallic, with a self-expanding mesh introduced into the coronary artery. It is used to prevent lumen closure (restenosis) following bypass surgery and to treat acute vessel closure after angioplasty.
See: illustration

self-expanding stent

A stent that opens on its own after it is deployed to the lumen it is intended to occupy, e.g., a blood vessel, tube, or organ.

short stent

Spot stent.

spot stent

A stent that is deployed across a focal, severe obstruction in a lumen rather than across a longer but less extensively diseased portion it.
Synonym: short stent

urologic stent

A biologically compatible stent inserted into the ureter or urethra to relieve or prevent urinary tract obstruction. Such stents are commonly placed in the urinary tract after endoureterotomy and endopyelotomy.

stent

See STENTING.

Stent

An expandable "scaffold-like" device, usually constructed of a stainless steel material, that is inserted into an artery to expand the inside passage and improve blood flow.

stent

slender tube inserted into a blood vessel/cannulated structure; maintains/restores lumen

stent

(stent)
1. Device used to maintain a bodily orifice or cavity during skin grafting, or to immobilize a skin graft after placement.
2. Slender thread, rod, or catheter, lying within the lumen of tubular structures, used to provide support during or after their anastomosis, or to ensure patency of an intact but contracted lumen.
[C. Stent]

stent (stent),

n 1. a device used to hold a skin graft placed to maintain a body orifice, cavity, or space. An acrylic resin appliance used as a positioning guide or support.
2. an appliance that maintains tissue (e.g., to maintain a skin transplant in a predetermined position).

stent

a mold for keeping a skin graft in place, made of Stent's mass or some acrylic or dental compound; by extension, a device or mold of a suitable material used to hold a skin graft in place or to provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed. Also used in vascular and bile duct surgery, and repair of laryngeal, tracheal, nasal trauma and stenosis.

Patient discussion about stent

Q. How long can a person lives after having stents put into their heart?

A. I had 2 stents inserted in 1997. I'm still alive. No problems.

Q. I still have chest pain after 5 angioplasties/stents. Does anybody else still have that much angina?

A. my uncle had the same problem. went through several catheterization at several different cardiologist (some are well known), but couldn't get this annoying pain off his chest. the weird part was that it didn't even reacted to effort. but eventually (i don't remember the stent amount) one of the cardiologist solved the problem. so don't give up and continue searching the cause!

More discussions about stent
References in periodicals archive ?
Drug-coated stents discharge their cargo slowly over several weeks, the period when the vessel is still traumatized from angioplasty and at greatest risk of forming a clog inside the stent, says cardiologist David J.
Endoscopic followup examinations with a flexible endoscope were performed after removal of the stent and at the final followup visit.
Funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation, this network meta-analysis was designed to compare the safety and effectiveness of bare-metal stents, the CYPHER([R]) Stent, and the Taxus Stent in a large patient population to increase the ability to detect and understand low frequency events, such as death and stent thrombosis.
Curiously, 12 people getting an endarterectomy had subsequent heart attacks, compared with 4 in the group getting stents, possibly because of greater physical stress during endarterectomy, comments Jack V.
The Company's novel polymer-free drug eluting technologies based on Hydroxyapatite could also provide an attractive alternative to current polymer-based drug eluting coatings on the stent market, which have been associated with undesirable medical effects.
Researchers now report that stents coated with a drug that inhibits cell migration and growth sharply reduce blockages in repaired arteries.
Tryton Medical's Side-Branch Stent([TM]) has all the characteristics of a state-of the art workhorse stent, providing proven stent coverage to bifurcation lesions while eliminating the need for provisional stenting.
The current problems arise because a newly implanted stent doesn't stay bare for long.
Cook's Zilver PTX drug-eluting vascular stent is an investigational device not approved for sale in the United States.
When doctors perform angioplasty or insert a stent, fragments of blood clots break up and flow downstream.
OTCBB: MIVT) (FWB: MIV), a leading developer of next-generation biocompatible polymer-free drug-eluting stents and advanced drug delivery systems, announced that it has entered into a formal agreement to acquire Biosync Scientific, an India-based designer and developer of innovative interventional cardiology products, including cardiovascular stents.
The safety and efficacy results achieved with the Endeavor drug-eluting stent are impressive and likely driven by key design elements aimed at the healing phase, by combining optimum choices of stent platform, polymer and drug," said Medtronic Sr.