stenothermal


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stenothermal

 [sten″o-ther´mal] (stenothermic [sten″o-ther´mik]) pertaining to or characterized by tolerance of only a narrow range of temperature.

sten·o·ther·mal

(sten'ō-ther'măl),
Thermostable through a narrow temperature range; able to withstand only slight changes in temperature.
[steno- + G. thermē, heat]

stenothermal

/steno·ther·mal/ (sten″o-ther´mal) stenothermic.

stenothermal

(stĕn′ə-thûr′məl) also

stenothermic

(-mĭk) or

stenothermous

(-məs)
adj.
Capable of living or growing only within a limited range of temperature.

sten′o·therm′ n.

sten·o·ther·mal

(sten'ō-thĕr'măl)
Thermostable through a narrow temperature range; able to withstand only slight changes in temperature.
[steno- + G. thermē, heat]

stenothermal, stenothermic

pertaining to or characterized by tolerance of only a narrow range of temperature.
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References in periodicals archive ?
geiseri in stenothermal waters breeds throughout the year regardless of other environmental factors.
If reproduction truly coincides with these factors, stenothermal environments, such as spring systems, would negate the need for seasonal spawning and make continuous spawning favorable.
However, synchronous batch spawning can also be found in stenothermal waters (Schenck and Whiteside, 1977; Perkin et al, 2012); therefore, selection for this reproductive scheme does not seem to be an adaption to a specific hydrology or temperature regime.
Environmental variables within the upper San Marcos River differed from Florida streams inhabited by the species, including year-round stenothermal water temperature and turbidity was generally lower (Swift, 1970).
Water quality in this section of the San Marcos River was characterized by low turbidity, stenothermal water temperature (i.
Among scallops, COX activity ranged significantly higher in Aequipecten opercularis from the warmer Irish Sea than in cold adapted stenothermal Adamussium colbecki from the high Antarctic, whereas CS activities were similar in both species (Philipp et al.
Levels of metabolic cold adaptation: tradeoffs in eurythermal and stenothermal ectotherms.
In our study we investigated oxygen binding to the hemocyanin of this stenothermal Antarctic octopod by using a technique that allows continuous and simultaneous recordings of blood pH and oxygenation and the construction of diagrams depicting changes in oxygen saturation with pH (pH/saturation diagrams; Portner, 1990).