stemma

(redirected from stemmata)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to stemmata: ocellus, ocelli

stemma

  1. an OCELLUS.
  2. the projection in arthropods that bears an antenna.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The flicking motion may attract the attention of certain prey species, and the spyhop exposes the larva's stalked stemmata and multi-segmented antennae to increase sensitivity to prey or disturbance.
Head 5 mm across; red; shiny rugose; a row of five black spots across the lower part of the face, the outer spots surrounding the stemmata, and the central one on the clypeus; mouthparts brown; scattered long, pale, setae, especially ventrally.
Mark Golledge, from Berkshire, traced his family back to Alfred the Great through the "Stemmata Chicheleana" historical documents.
The editors also describe the groupings of the manuscripts and provide stemmata for each of the two works.
The text contains a glossary, concordance, bibliography and stemmata.
Where we can establish stemmata for groups of surviving poetic manuscript texts, the number of hypothetical ancestors that come to light testifies to the extent of this loss.
Head capsule 0.8 mm wide, dark brown; stemmata black, 1-3 grouped together; first and second contiguously located (same in test of instars).
531], received less of an endorsement.) Peace's exhaustive study of the manuscript transmission, combined with a meticulous examination of textual variants, enabled her to construct (for the first time) elaborate stemmata, presented in fold-out tables, for each of the treatises.
He offers three different stemmata which reflect the differing traditions of the individual books/group of books.
8, stemmata, `family trees', is the controlling motif for H.'s study, bringing into play a plethora of kledonomantic (see O'Hara, above) ancestries which show how Juvenal's poem poking fun at pedigrees is fully knowing (and telling) about the `importance' of nobilitas (for which also read Romanitas).
His arguments, involving complicated stemmata which include several hypothetical versions, are impressive and convincing, but are also extremely dense and hard to follow: I doubt whether more than a minority of devoted readers will struggle through to the end.