stemma


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stemma

  1. an OCELLUS.
  2. the projection in arthropods that bears an antenna.
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References in periodicals archive ?
One wishes he had either developed a more ramified stemma, grounding some ranking of manuscripts within the different families, or demonstrated the impossibility of doing so.
Recently, a team of scholars affiliated to the University of Roma "La Sapienza" have tested an "integrated method for stemma reconstruction which combines the traditional ecdotics approach with an information theory oriented methodology" (Canettieri, Loreto, Rovetta, Santini, <http://w3.
Les Stemmas du Charroi de Nimes et de la Prise d'Orange.
The cuticle above each stemma usually forms a biconvex corneal (cuticular) lens exterior to the crystalline cone and the various stemmatal sensory components of the cranial interior (5), (6).
Connections are central to all of the articles, whether focused on connections between text and image, male monks and female monks, individual manuscripts and textual stemma, or reform houses and one another.
The identity of the young Florentine banker, Bindo Altoviti, is certain, as research on the family stemma and the painting's provenance has confirmed.
He argues that Huygen had access to early scribal copies of Donne's poems, perhaps from the early 1620s if not earlier, and is able to situate the sources for the translations, which are the earliest known to exist, in the overall stemma for each poem.
A Preliminary Stemma for the Drafts and Revisions of Tennessee Williams's Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955).
It is a pity that neither commentaries attempt a stemma for either the translations or the various versions.
Other essays include work on the stemma of the Piers Plowman B manuscripts, Byron and Medwin, Edward Young's The Centaur Not Fabulous, the Hinman collator, and Samuel Richardson's anonymous periodical writings.
Strijbosch undertakes an extremely thorough study of the five surviving versions of the Reis texts, creating a clear argument for the much-disputed stemma codicum.
The prose history, which Daniel worked on from around 1605 to his death in 1619, is not to be included, although I have studied closely (and prepared a stemma of) the manuscript versions for what they tell us, among other things, about Daniel's links with William Camden and Sir Robert Cotton, and with Robert, Earl of Salisbury and the Earl of Somerset.