stem cell

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stem cell

1. any precursor cell;
2. a cell with daughter cells that may differentiate into other cell types.
3. a cell capable of maintaining its own number while exporting progeny to one or more cell lineages.

stem cell

n.
An unspecialized cell that can give rise to one or more different types of specialized cells, such as blood cells and nerve cells. Stem cells are present in embryos and in various tissues of adult organisms and are widely used in scientific research.

stem cell

(stem sel)
1. Any precursor cell.
2. A cell with daughter cells that may differentiate into other cell types.

stem cell

a special kind of cell from an EMBRYO, FOETUS or adult, capable of renewing itself under certain conditions, and of becoming specialized cells that make up the different TISSUES and ORGANS of the body A stem cell remains largely undifferentiated and uncommitted to a specific function, until it receives a signal to develop into a specialized cell (see CELL DIFFERENTIATION). An embryonic stem cell derives from a group of cells, the inner cell mass, from a 4–5 day old embryo, called a BLASTOCYST. This group of cells can be removed and cultured into embryonic stem cells. An embryonic germ cell derives from foetal cells destined to be reproductive cells (see GERM LINE). Embryonic stem cells and germ cells have the potential to differentiate into almost any or all of the cell types of the body i.e. they are ‘pluripotent’, but they do not have identical properties. An adult stem cell is an undifferentiated cell occurring in differentiated tissue, such as that of BONE MARROW, BRAIN, SKELETAL MUSCLE, LIVER, SKIN, PANCREAS or the BLOOD, with the capacity to yield specialized cell types of the tissue of origin. However, adult stem cells appear to have the potential to generate specialized cells of another tissue under appropriate conditions, for example cells from bone marrow generating cells resembling NEURONS and other cell types found in the brain. Hence it seems that they are capable of being genetically reprogrammed. The ability of stem cells to proliferate and to differentiate into specialized cell types makes them potentially useful for the repair and replacement of damaged and diseased tissues, see THERAPEUTIC CLONING.

Stem cell

Undifferentiated cell that retains the ability to develop into any one of numerous cell types.

stem cell

(stem sel)
1. Any precursor cell.
2. Cell with daughter cells that may differentiate into other cell types.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though Byers appears sympathetic to scientists' eagerness to find some form of treatment for some of the worst diseases humankind currently faces, he argues that stem-cell research using embryos and fetal matter clearly cannot pass the church's moral litmus test.
Our Principles Will Plot Our Course With adult stem-cell research offering both proven results in the present and promising developments in the future, why even start down the dark path of embryonic stem-cell research?
But for some reason, the liberals' moral outrage ends at capital punishment, and they do support embryonic stem-cell research, saying that an embryo is just a "few cells." Well, a criminal could be deemed just a "bunch of cells." This latter argument would not hold credence with the liberals; why does the former?
As noted by The New York Times in a late May article, coalitions of "Catholics and evangelicals form the backbone in the fights against gay marriage, stem-cell research and euthanasia, and for religious school vouchers."
Why, then, is there so much enthusiasm among scientists and other elites for embryonic stem-cell research? The answer is that over much of the last century, our civilization has lost its moral bearings with respect to the life issues.
His decision allowed federal funding for stem-cell research on 60 stem-cell lines consisting of what he called "embryos that have already been destroyed." The president's position to allow federal research funding on embryos already killed seemed on the surface to be consistent with his original policy and in harmony with a pro-life agenda.
In fighting back against his son's injury, Reed ended up being instrumental in passing the first US law that provides grants for stem-cell research, the Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999 (AB-714), and the first stem-cell supportive law in the United States (California SB-253, 2002).
December 6 -- A three-judge appellate panel hears arguments regarding the legality of federal funding for stem-cell research that uses cells from human embryos.
16 shows that 47 percent of Americans oppose federal funding of embryonic stem-cell research, while 38 percent support such funding.
But it is not clear what that status quo represented, and the vast bulk of stem-cell research has been funded by the federal government.
The right to protect lives is one." Other states are taking similar action to curb stem-cell research. Their moves are reverse images of legislation in Maryland, New Jersey, California, New York and other states that passed their own laws encouraging and even funding stem cell research despite the restrictions under former President George W.
"I believe that the restrictions that President Bush has placed on funding of human embryonic stem-cell research have handcuffed our scientists and hindered our ability to compete with other nations."