steer

(redirected from steerer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to steerer: stirrer

steer

Medtalk verb To direct a Pt to a particular facility for various reasons–eg, types of benefits provided by the Pt's health care policy, and ability to pay Vox populi noun Moo

steer

(stēr)
To direct or guide along a desired course. In education it is to provide guidance to a student; in endoscopy, to push a scope through an organ or toward a lesion.

steer

castrated male cattle beast over a year of age. See also bullock, buller steer.

steer bulling
see bulling.
References in periodicals archive ?
Give your best heavy-weather steerers rest; you will need them later.
Helms are far forward to put the steerer amid the action and nearer the pointy end for aggressive race starts while behind is acres of space for the mainsheet trimmer.
In the prow, a drummer beats out time; in the stern, a steerer keeps the boat on course with a giant paddle.
At the twin wheels, the steerer can operate the two electric Lewmar 50 Evo winches, and large binnacles hold a B&G nine-inch Zeus plotter on each plus autopilot and Quick thruster, along with power controls on the starboard side.
The backstay uses pulley adjustment and the overall deck looks very clean with conventional inboard jib tracks and a wide main track just ahead of the steerer --so ideal for short-handed sailing.
Power controls for the 39 horsepower Volvo saildrive are conventionally placed at ankle height to starboard, while underfoot, lifting chocks support the steerer when heeled.
Aesthetics are a personal choice but for my money the Judel/Vrolijk lines are pleasing as they flow, rather than jar as some other angular designs do, with a wide rounded hull and fine bow that should promote windward sailing while the low profile saloon allows good visibility for the steerer and adds to the flowing overall shape.
But up on deck the tired steerer usually just needs to know how he's doing in relation to the boat's polars and when is the best time to tack or gybe.