steam

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steam

(stēm) [AS. steam, vapor]
1. The invisible vapor into which water is converted at the boiling point.
2. The mist formed by condensation of water vapor.
3. Any vaporous exhalation.

steam

the vapor created by heating water to 212°F (100°C).

steam sterilization
see sterilization (2).
References in classic literature ?
The steamboat throbbed on its way through an interminable suspense.
Steamboats and shipping of all sorts lay there, tempted by the enormous sums of money offered by fugitives, and it is said that many who swam out to these vessels were thrust off with boathooks and drowned.
A narrow space on the right-hand side of the channel was left clear for steamboats, but the rest of the river was covered with the wide-stretching nets.
Major organization : STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CITY OF - PURCHASING DEPT.
Swenson extensively researched the steamboat industry, initially planning to write a book focusing primarily on those built in Metropolis.
The audience will then be treated to a live accompaniment to the 1928 silent feature Steamboat Bill, Jr.
Synopsis: Miss Susie had a steamboat; the steamboat had a bell.
Steamboat swing trip Bon | Voyage is offering a Mississippi Swing music steamboat cruise for PS2,549- a saving of PS1,350) on this eight-night holiday departing on September 5 of 12.
Meghan McKeon was sentenced to 22 years in prison after accepting a plea agreement, Steamboat Springs Today reported (http://tinyurl.
com)-- The Fulton Steamboat Inn, along with Huckleberry's Restaurant and Tavern, are excited to invite guests to experience all the outdoor fun in the fall that Lancaster has to offer.
2) As our research has continued and, particularly as a result of access to new sources--some by discovery, others thanks to digitisation (3)--we are convinced that there is a need to stress even more strongly the rapid, indeed virtually immediate, changes in economy and society brought by the steamboat and hence its special significance as a technological breakthrough.
Keeping the enslaved in the center of the story, the impeccably researched book highlights well-known texts like Solomon Northrup and William Wells Brown, but digs deeply beneath the surface to use letters of steamboat patrons, court cases, plantation account books, contemporary pamphlets, and documents ranging from Liverpool to Havana to encompass multiple perspectives.