steam

(redirected from steamboat)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

steam

(stēm) [AS. steam, vapor]
1. The invisible vapor into which water is converted at the boiling point.
2. The mist formed by condensation of water vapor.
3. Any vaporous exhalation.

steam

the vapor created by heating water to 212°F (100°C).

steam sterilization
see sterilization (2).
References in classic literature ?
She was steaming at such a pace that in a minute she seemed halfway between the steamboat and the Martians-- a diminishing black bulk against the receding horizontal expanse of the Essex coast.
They got on the steamboat just as she was starting.
The next he knew it was morning, and he opened his eyes to find his boat rubbing softly against the piles of Steamboat Wharf at Benicia.
When the steamboat arrived at Dawson, White Fang went ashore.
Several hours' work a day, chopping firewood for the steamboat companies, sufficed to keep him in food.
There was nothing but that wretched, old, mangled steamboat I was leaning against, while he talked fluently about 'the necessity for every man to get on.
We must have been struck squarely amidships, for I saw nothing, the strange steamboat having passed beyond my line of vision.
Beyond the steamboat wharf, the fishing wharves dwindled to stages for the drying of nets; and here, away from the noise and clatter of the alien town, Saxon and Billy took off their packs and rested.
It certainly was not called a small steamboat without reason.
WE had powerful good luck; because we got a chance in a stern-wheeler from away North which was bound for one of them bayous or one-horse rivers away down Louisiana way, and so we could go all the way down the Upper Mississippi and all the way down the Lower Mississippi to that farm in Arkansaw without having to change steamboats at St.
On my passage, I paid particular attention to the direction which the steamboats took to go to Philadelphia.
Formerly one was obliged to travel in India by the old cumbrous methods of going on foot or on horseback, in palanquins or unwieldly coaches; now fast steamboats ply on the Indus and the Ganges, and a great railway, with branch lines joining the main line at many points on its route, traverses the peninsula from Bombay to Calcutta in three days.