steady state

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state

 [stāt]
condition or situation.
alpha state the state of relaxation and peaceful awakefulness associated with prominent alpha brain wave activity.
anxiety state the condition of experiencing undue anxiety, as in anxiety disorders.
excited state the condition of a nucleus, atom, or molecule produced by the addition of energy to the system as the result of absorption of photons or of inelastic collisions with other particles or systems.
ground state the condition of lowest energy of a nucleus, atom, or molecule.
persistent vegetative state a condition of profound nonresponsiveness in the wakeful state caused by brain damage at whatever level and characterized by a nonfunctioning cerebral cortex, the absence of any discernible adaptive response to the external environment, akinesia, mutism, and inability to signal; the electroencephalogram may be isoelectric or show abnormal activity. Vegetative states raise ethical questions regarding appropriate care, use of resources, and allowing a patient to die.
refractory state a condition of subnormal excitability of muscle and nerve following excitation.
resting state the physiologic condition achieved by complete bed rest for at least 1 hour.
steady state dynamic equilibrium.

stead·y state (ss, s),

1. any condition in which the formation or introduction of substances just keeps pace with their destruction or removal so that all volumes, concentrations, pressures, and flows remain constant;
2. in enzyme kinetics, conditions in which the rate of change in the concentration of any enzyme species (for example, free enzyme or the enzyme-substrate binary complex) is zero or much less than the rate of product formation.
3. a state obtained in moderate muscular exercise, when the removal of lactic acid by oxidation keeps pace with its production, the oxygen supply being adequate, and the muscles do not go into debt for oxygen;
[The abbreviations s and ss often appear in subscript.]

steady state (s, ss)

[sted′ē]
Etymology: AS, stedefast, firm in its place; L, status, condition
a basic physiological concept implying that the various forces and processes of life are in a state of homeostasis. Living organisms are in constant flux, working to balance the internal and external environments in an effort to prevent a deficiency or an excess that might cause illness. Steady state is a complete state of well-being involving total adaptation.

stead·y state

(s) (sted'ē stāt)
1. A condition obtained in moderate muscular exercise when the removal of lactic acid by oxidation keeps pace with its production, the oxygen supply being adequate, and the muscles do not rely on energy from anaerobic sources.
2. Any condition in which the formation or introduction of substances just keeps pace with their destruction or removal so that all volumes, concentrations, pressures, and flows remain constant.
3. In enzyme kinetics, conditions such that the rate of change in the concentration of any enzyme species (e.g., free enzyme or the enzyme-substrate binary complex) is zero or much less than the rate of formation of product. Often subscript s or ss.

stead·y state

(s, ss) (sted'ē stāt)
1. A condition obtained in moderate muscular exercise when the removal of lactic acid by oxidation keeps pace with its production, the oxygen supply being adequate, and the muscles do not rely on energy from anaerobic sources.
2. Any condition in which the formation or introduction of substances just keeps pace with their destruction or removal so that all volumes, concentrations, pressures, and flows remain constant.
3. In enzyme kinetics, conditions such that the rate of change in the concentration of any enzyme species (e.g., free enzyme or the enzyme-substrate binary complex) is zero or much less than the rate of formation of product.

steady state,

n a basic physiologic concept implying that the various forces and processes of life are in a state of homeostasis.

state

condition or situation.

excited state
the condition of a nucleus, atom or molecule produced by the addition of energy to the system as the result of absorption of photons or of inelastic collisions with other particles or systems.
ground state
the condition of lowest energy of a nucleus, atom or molecule.
refractory state
a condition of subnormal excitability of muscle and nerve following excitation.
resting state
the physiological condition achieved by complete rest for at least 1 hour.
steady state
dynamic equilibrium.
References in periodicals archive ?
This supplements Fitch's analysis of the originator's historical data when determining the following steady state performance assumptions and stresses:
To the extent that one of the main purposes of the interest rate policy is to keep inflation low and stable, this policy creates two steady states, but the policymaker may be more or less indifferent between the two outcomes.
In this section the intertemporal equilibrium dynamics of the two-country model is derived and the existence and multiplicity of steady states are investigated.
However, the fact that there are two steady states suggests that it may be revealing to investigate the global dynamics.
24) With respect to the level of volatility, when there exist multiple steady states in both economies, paying interest reduces volatility, as Friedman had envisioned.
An ability of our economies to avoid inferior steady states would suggest that such coordination could occur in a natural way, even in economies with a decentralized structure such as ours.
Living systems exhibit many variables in dynamic steady states.
The simplest case is learning of stochastic steady states.
On the east side of JTML, where the street slope is reduced by the dipping terrain and where 40% of the wheel weight lead was found, wheel weights along the median were 50% of the steady state.
For the `nonlinear' columns, we compute steady states for each of the Lucas formulations with taxes on interest income at US levels and, again, at lower levels.
We show that both income and capital per worker are lower in the feasible steady state than in the potential steady state.
OECD countries have never been too far from their steady states, and the reduction of dispersion is mostly explained in terms of convergence in steady states themselves, that is, in the long-run determinants of per capita income (savings rates, human capital accumulation, etc.