steady state

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state

 [stāt]
condition or situation.
alpha state the state of relaxation and peaceful awakefulness associated with prominent alpha brain wave activity.
anxiety state the condition of experiencing undue anxiety, as in anxiety disorders.
excited state the condition of a nucleus, atom, or molecule produced by the addition of energy to the system as the result of absorption of photons or of inelastic collisions with other particles or systems.
ground state the condition of lowest energy of a nucleus, atom, or molecule.
persistent vegetative state a condition of profound nonresponsiveness in the wakeful state caused by brain damage at whatever level and characterized by a nonfunctioning cerebral cortex, the absence of any discernible adaptive response to the external environment, akinesia, mutism, and inability to signal; the electroencephalogram may be isoelectric or show abnormal activity. Vegetative states raise ethical questions regarding appropriate care, use of resources, and allowing a patient to die.
refractory state a condition of subnormal excitability of muscle and nerve following excitation.
resting state the physiologic condition achieved by complete bed rest for at least 1 hour.
steady state dynamic equilibrium.

stead·y state (ss, s),

1. any condition in which the formation or introduction of substances just keeps pace with their destruction or removal so that all volumes, concentrations, pressures, and flows remain constant;
2. in enzyme kinetics, conditions in which the rate of change in the concentration of any enzyme species (for example, free enzyme or the enzyme-substrate binary complex) is zero or much less than the rate of product formation.
3. a state obtained in moderate muscular exercise, when the removal of lactic acid by oxidation keeps pace with its production, the oxygen supply being adequate, and the muscles do not go into debt for oxygen;
[The abbreviations s and ss often appear in subscript.]

steady state (s, ss)

[sted′ē]
Etymology: AS, stedefast, firm in its place; L, status, condition
a basic physiological concept implying that the various forces and processes of life are in a state of homeostasis. Living organisms are in constant flux, working to balance the internal and external environments in an effort to prevent a deficiency or an excess that might cause illness. Steady state is a complete state of well-being involving total adaptation.

stead·y state

(s) (sted'ē stāt)
1. A condition obtained in moderate muscular exercise when the removal of lactic acid by oxidation keeps pace with its production, the oxygen supply being adequate, and the muscles do not rely on energy from anaerobic sources.
2. Any condition in which the formation or introduction of substances just keeps pace with their destruction or removal so that all volumes, concentrations, pressures, and flows remain constant.
3. In enzyme kinetics, conditions such that the rate of change in the concentration of any enzyme species (e.g., free enzyme or the enzyme-substrate binary complex) is zero or much less than the rate of formation of product. Often subscript s or ss.

stead·y state

(s, ss) (sted'ē stāt)
1. A condition obtained in moderate muscular exercise when the removal of lactic acid by oxidation keeps pace with its production, the oxygen supply being adequate, and the muscles do not rely on energy from anaerobic sources.
2. Any condition in which the formation or introduction of substances just keeps pace with their destruction or removal so that all volumes, concentrations, pressures, and flows remain constant.
3. In enzyme kinetics, conditions such that the rate of change in the concentration of any enzyme species (e.g., free enzyme or the enzyme-substrate binary complex) is zero or much less than the rate of formation of product.

steady state,

n a basic physiologic concept implying that the various forces and processes of life are in a state of homeostasis.

state

condition or situation.

excited state
the condition of a nucleus, atom or molecule produced by the addition of energy to the system as the result of absorption of photons or of inelastic collisions with other particles or systems.
ground state
the condition of lowest energy of a nucleus, atom or molecule.
refractory state
a condition of subnormal excitability of muscle and nerve following excitation.
resting state
the physiological condition achieved by complete rest for at least 1 hour.
steady state
dynamic equilibrium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eusepi accepted the nonlinear nature of Figure 1 with its two steady states.
One of the steady states has inflation equal to the targeted inflation rate [pi]*, and the other steady state has a lower inflation rate.
However, in this environment, not all candidate steady-state equilibria necessarily satisfy Equation (16), and hence, not all values of z satisfying Equation (17) constitute legitimate steady states.
The first is whether or not a decentralized dynamic economy with multiple steady states will reach one of the steady states.
I conducted studies in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to ascertain the baseline or steady state amount of metallic lead found in urban streets, the rate of lead deposition, and the rate of lead abrasion.
We show that both income and capital per worker are lower in the feasible steady state than in the potential steady state.
In section III we show that the estimated steady states implicit in these convergence equations are quite different, implying alternative explanations behind the sigma convergence process in the OECD.
If there is more than one steady state, it may not be advisable to work with a linear approximation unless one has a strong reason for believing that only one of the steady states is relevant.
As the liquidity constraint (7) binds at steady states, condition (8) implies the following: Workers spend their money holdings, i.
In other words, both complete CS and zero CS are possible steady states under our specification of endogenous beliefs.
Hence, the two steady states can be Pareto-ranked: All agents prefer the good equilibrium with trade to the bad equilibrium without.
It allows for multiple perfect-foresight steady states that are, alternately, stable and saddle-path stable.