statutes of limitations


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statutes of limitations

Federal and state laws that set maximum time limits in which lawsuits can be brought, and actions, claims, or rights can be enforced. No legal action can be brought outside the time allowed by law even if the person or entity has a claim or cause of action. Time limitations vary from state to state.
References in periodicals archive ?
Accordingly, when necessary, Florida litigants should properly recognize the statutes of limitations tolling exceptions to the circumstances expressed by the legislature in F.S.
Division 2's approach has the advantage of providing greater certainty and predictability to government agencies as to their own liability, which is the general purpose of all statutes of limitations. (119) Additionally, the legislative history of section 42.56.550(6) suggests that the legislature did not intend to punish agencies for providing documents in a single installment by imposing a longer limitations period.
Statutes of limitations are said to be the desire of legislators to not overburden debtors, and to prevent the accumulation of debts for many years.
Statutes of limitations benefit society as well as the accused.
Organizations of crime victims have been clamoring for the elimination of statutes of limitations for vicious crimes, arguing that the 2005 revision was insufficient.
260, [section] 7 (2006) (allowing statute of limitations tolled where plaintiff was minor child); Developments in the Law Statutes of Limitations, 63 HARV.
The doctrine of nullum tempus allows the government to sue defendants that could not be sued by any private party due to the time limitations posed by statutes of limitations, laches, and statutes of repose.
All states have statutes of limitations which bar suit (however meritorious the claim for medical malpractice might be) after a specified period of time.
Other state legislatures are also enacting laws that eliminate or extend statutes of limitations for offenses in which DNA evidence is found at the crime scene.
This Comment will argue that: (1) DNA-based indictments meet the legal sufficiency requirements for description; (2) DNA indictments are generally consistent with the rationales behind statutes of limitations; (3) DNA indictments are subject to certain limitations; and (4) checks must be employed when using genetic profiles to commence a prosecution.
This type of comprehensive protection necessarily controls over other statutes of limitations. [T]he fact that the legislature created an across-the-board rule limiting the time in which to file "any action" against a public entity or its employees to one year is powerful evidence that the legislature intended the more general statute to be controlling.'
Modern science is driving states to take a hard look at their statutes of limitations when it comes to sexual assault.