statute

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Related to statute law: statutory law

statute

Any law enacted by a state legislature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Justice Laskin in the Court of Appeal decision in the Port Arthur Shipbuilding case has now been translated into statute law under the B.
By contrast, it is desirable that statute law be flexible, even protean.
22] In the UK each jurisdiction has its own law commission "to keep the law under review" and also there exist societies such as the Statute Law Society.
1 The presumption that statute law is not unjust, inequitable and unreasonable
The equitable maxim that equity follows the law explains that equity does not replace statute law or common law.
In 1982 the amended Constitution recognised Aboriginal and treaty rights and the precedence of those over statute law and regulation.
Henry and his successors thwarted statute law, also by using it to determine the legitimate heir to the throne.
Another first for Olitalia is the weighing-filler technology, which can be relied on to automatically assure the minimum fill quantity laid down by statute law.
The necessity that the case involves substantial goods was not spelled out in statute law until 1487, 3 Henry VII, c.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-21 December 2006-UK Statute Law Database launches(C)1994-2006 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.
First, he determines that state law, including its common law as well as its statute law, should apply in cases governed by section 34 when federal law is silent.
With an eye toward inspiring further research and study, Smith's nine essays ably cover the atmosphere of the courts, the ecclesiastical lawyers, and entry into the profession, canonical jurisprudence, censures and penalties, including their effectiveness, plenary and summary criminal procedures, clergy discipline cases and the role of bishops in their administration, commissions and clandestine marriages, the influence of statute law, and the waning of the system which both bishops and parishioners had found to be ineffective in dealing with clergy misbehavior.