status

(redirected from statuses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

status

 [sta´tus, stat´us] (L.)
state, particularly in reference to a morbid condition.
absence status sustained clouding of consciousness for several hours, with no interval of normal mental activity, and with few stereotyped movements or no abnormal motor activity.
status asthma´ticus a particularly severe episode of asthma that does not respond adequately to ordinary therapeutic measures and usually requires hospitalization.
status epilep´ticus rapid succession of epileptic spasms without intervals of consciousness; brain damage may result.
status lympha´ticus lymphatism.
performance status ability of a patient to function, as measured by a performance scale.
status thymicolympha´ticus a condition resembling lymphatism, with enlargement of lymphadenoid tissue and of the thymus as the special influencing factor; formerly thought to be the cause of sudden death in children.
status verruco´sus a wartlike appearance of the cerebral cortex, produced by disorderly arrangement of the neuroblasts, so that the formation of fissures and sulci is irregular and unpredictable.
status (omaha) in the omaha system, the condition of the client in relation to objective and subjective defining characteristics.

sta·tus

(stā'tŭs, stat'ŭs), The correct plural of this word is status, not stati.
A state or condition.
[L. a way of standing]

status

Medtalk A condition or state. See Code status, Diversion status, DNI status, ECOG performance status, Mental status, Provisional status, Serostatus, Socioeconomic status.

sta·tus

(stat'ŭs)
A state or condition.
[L. a way of standing]

sta·tus

(stat'ŭs) The correct plural of this word is status, not stati.
A state or condition.
[L. a way of standing]
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, the same intervention technique can serve different functions for persons in different statuses. For example, interest inventories can expand the range of options of which the person is aware for someone in the Imagining status, clarify areas of interest for someone in the iNforming status, narrow the focus for someone in the Choosing status, suggest related fields for someone in the Obtaining status, assist in planning next steps in career pathing for someone in the Maintaining status, and ease transitions by suggesting alternatives for someone in the Exiting status.
First, in which INCOME status or statuses is the individual engaged, and in which of these statuses is the problem located?
Using the theoretical constructs associated with each of these statuses as an initial checklist, the counselor can explore the client's issues in each status.
The framework itself, its six constituent statuses, the actual relevance of the suggested interventions for each of these statuses, and the extent of applicability of the framework across diverse populations need to be empirically tested.
Considering only correlations of at least moderate strength (i.e., absolute values of .25 or greater), consistent patterns of relationships between the statuses and the underlying dimensions emerged across the three sets of domains.
Participants assigned to the foreclosed status on the EIPQ had only a 32% chance of also being assigned to foreclosure on the EOM-EIS-II, with most (55%) of the disagreements involving assignment to achievement on the EQM-EIS-II Participants classified as moratorium on the EIPQ had a 43% chance of also being placed in moratorium on the EQM-EIS-II, with classification discrepancies fairly evenly distributed among the other three statuses (diffusion, 41%; foreclosure, 26%; and achievement, 32%).
With regard to the EOM-EIS-II, participants classified as diffused had only a 29% chance of also being classified as diffused on the EIPQ, with classification discrepancies primarily involving assignment to the foreclosed (38%) and moratorium (36%) statuses. Participants classified as foreclosed on the EOM-EIS-II had a 38% chance of also being classified as foreclosed on the EIPQ, with disagreements primarily involving assignment to the diffused and achieved statuses (36% each).
For all three domain clusters, commitment scores differed significantly between all pairs of statuses. In ascending order of mean commitment score, the EOM-EIS-II statuses were ordered as follows: moratorium, diffused, foreclosed, and achieved.
For the ideological and interpersonal domain clusters, mean diffusion scores did not differ significantly between the foreclosed and moratorium statuses.