palpation

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palpation

 [pal-pa´shun]
the act of feeling with the hand; the application of the fingers with light pressure to the surface of the body for the purpose of determining the condition of the parts beneath in physical diagnosis.
bimanual palpation palpation with both hands in the physical examination of a patient.
Bimanual palpation. From Gorrie et al., 1994.

pal·pa·tion

(pal-pā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with palpitation.
1. Examination with the hands, feeling for organs, masses, or infiltration of a part of the body, feeling the heart or pulse beat, or vibrations in the chest.
2. Touching, feeling, or perceiving by the sense of touch.
[L. palpatio, fr. palpo, pp. -atus, to touch, stroke]

palpation

Clinical medicine
1. A part of a physical examination, in which an examiner lighly presses with the hands over the surface to ID lumps, bumps, beating, buzzing, and burbling of the body below. See Percussion. Cf Palpitation.
2. Touching, feeling. Cf Touchy-feely.

pal·pa·tion

(pal-pā'shŭn)
1. Examination with the hands, feeling for organs, masses, or infiltration of a part of the body, feeling the heart or pulse beat, vibrations in the chest, and other diagnostic functions.
Synonym(s): touch (2) .
2. Touching, feeling, or perceiving by the sense of touch.

palpation

Examination by feeling with the fingers and hands.

Palpation

The examination of the body using the sense of touch. There are two types: light and deep.

pal·pa·tion

(pal-pā'shŭn)
Examination with hands, feeling for organs, masses, or infiltration of a body part, feeling the heart or pulse beat, or chest vibrations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of static palpation originated from personal philosophy for 28% of student respondents.
(3) The evidentiary support for the use of static palpation to determine a spinal site of care was judged to be "unclear." (Some (4,14) but not all of the studies reviewed in the current article were included in the site of care article.) Several studies have called into question a manual therapist's ability to deliver forces to their intended targets.
Static palpation revealed pain and tightness in the thoracic erector spinae muscles bilaterally, the pectoralis major and minor bilaterally, and the third to seventh anterior intercostal muscles bilaterally.
Several areas in the patient's spine and extremities displaying altered joint motion were identified utilizing motion and static palpation, and joint play analysis.
An experienced palpator then determined using manual static palpation the location of the SP that lined up most closely to the right IAS.
With the patient in the supine position, static palpation revealed tender trigger points bilaterally in the cervical musculature and right trapezius.