state

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state

 [stāt]
condition or situation.
alpha state the state of relaxation and peaceful awakefulness associated with prominent alpha brain wave activity.
anxiety state the condition of experiencing undue anxiety, as in anxiety disorders.
excited state the condition of a nucleus, atom, or molecule produced by the addition of energy to the system as the result of absorption of photons or of inelastic collisions with other particles or systems.
ground state the condition of lowest energy of a nucleus, atom, or molecule.
persistent vegetative state a condition of profound nonresponsiveness in the wakeful state caused by brain damage at whatever level and characterized by a nonfunctioning cerebral cortex, the absence of any discernible adaptive response to the external environment, akinesia, mutism, and inability to signal; the electroencephalogram may be isoelectric or show abnormal activity. Vegetative states raise ethical questions regarding appropriate care, use of resources, and allowing a patient to die.
refractory state a condition of subnormal excitability of muscle and nerve following excitation.
resting state the physiologic condition achieved by complete bed rest for at least 1 hour.
steady state dynamic equilibrium.

state

(stāt),
A condition, situation, or status.
[L. status, condition, state]

state

(stāt) condition or situation.
alpha state  the state of relaxation and peaceful awakefulness, associated with prominent alpha brain wave activity.
persistent vegetative state  a condition of profound nonresponsiveness in the wakeful state caused by brain damage at any level and characterized by a nonfunctioning cerebral cortex, absence of response to the external environment, akinesia, mutism, and inability to signal.
refractory state  a condition of subnormal excitability of muscle and nerve following excitation.
resting state  the physiologic condition achieved by complete bed rest for at least one hour.
steady state  dynamic equilibrium.

state

(stāt)
n.
1. A condition or mode of being, as with regard to circumstances.
2. A condition of being in a stage or form, as of structure, growth, or development.
3. A mental or emotional condition.
4. The condition of a physical system with regard to phase, form, composition, or structure.

state

[stāt]
Etymology: L, status, condition
the circumstances or qualities that characterize a person, thing, or way of being at a particular time.

state

Medtalk A condition. See Acute confusional state, Character state, Fugue state, Ground state, Herald state of leukemia, Hypercoagulable state, Lacunar state, Persistent vegetative state, Preneoplastic state, Silent carrier state, Thromboembolic state, Trance state, Vegetative state.

state

(stāt)
A condition, situation, or status.
[L. status, condition, state]

state

condition or situation.

excited state
the condition of a nucleus, atom or molecule produced by the addition of energy to the system as the result of absorption of photons or of inelastic collisions with other particles or systems.
ground state
the condition of lowest energy of a nucleus, atom or molecule.
refractory state
a condition of subnormal excitability of muscle and nerve following excitation.
resting state
the physiological condition achieved by complete rest for at least 1 hour.
steady state
dynamic equilibrium.

Patient discussion about state

Q. Do we have these drugs in the United States and could you give me some information about them? Hello friends, I am diagnosed as Fibromyalgia for the past 6 months and I have been talking to people across the world and they have suggested taking some drugs that I am unable to find here in the United States. The people I have been talking to are mostly people from Australia. They have recommended Lamictal and Ultram. Do we have these drugs in the United States and could you give me some information about them?

A. I took everything over the courter,they didnot work,i had to go to a rheumatologist. She put me on ultram.they work.try them.

Q. Is methotrexate available in the United States as a treatment for fibromyalgia? Last year I was diagnosed as fibromyalgia. I feel a lot of fatigue and stiffness. I came upon a website from where I read that rheumatoid arthritis causes those same symptoms and can be treated with methotrexate. After reading that, I purchased a half year supply of the drug over the counter in Mexico. It eliminated all of my symptoms. A month after my supply ran out, all the symptoms returned. Is methotrexate available in the United States as a treatment for fibromyalgia?

A. Yes fatigue and stiffness are some of the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Methotrexate is certainly available in the United States, but it is not approved for nor used as a treatment for fibromyalgia. It was originally developed to treat cancer and subsequently found to be very effective for a number of inflammatory disorders, such as RA and psoriasis. Because fibromyalgia is not an inflammatory disorder – that is, there is no identifiable inflammation in the muscles or joints in individuals with this condition – it is not clear why you responded to this drug. You should tell your physician about your response to methotrexate. It may be possible that you have an inflammatory disorder rather than – or in addition to – fibromyalgia.

Q. Have alcohol-related crashes decreased in other states when they lowered the limit? I have a doubt even after updating with the local news. Have alcohol-related crashes decreased in other states when they lowered the limit?

A. Wisconsin has seen nearly a two percent decrease in alcohol-related crashes and almost a fourteen percent decrease in alcohol-related fatalities a year after implementing a .08 law. Since South Dakota put .08 in effect in 2002, alcohol-related crashes have decreased by 2.1 percent from the average of the previous three years.

More discussions about state
References in classic literature ?
In the midst of all this gallant array came an open barouche, drawn by four white horses; and in the barouche, with his massive head uncovered, sat the illustrious statesman, Old Stony Phiz himself.
The statesman received us with that old-fashioned courtesy for which he is remarkable, and seated us on the two luxuriant lounges on either side of the fireplace.
It is one of the most marked characteristics of Greek political theory that Plato and Aristotle think of the statesman as one who has knowledge of what ought to be done, and can help those who call him in to prescribe for them, rather than one who has power to control the forces of society.
So the Statesman resolved that he too would be honest, and the result was that he died of want.
I knew your fortitude would give out after a while," said the American Statesman, delighted; "your agony attests my political power.
The cashier caught the ministerial pair at the dawn of official delight, when the newly appointed statesman is benign and affable.
The philosopher only has knowledge, and yet the statesman and the poet are inspired.
From the outbreak attending the Revolution of 1688 he fled to England, where for the greater part of nine years he lived in the country as a sort of secretary to the retired statesman, Sir William Temple, who was his distant relative by marriage.
I am no statesman either," said Benassis, hastily interrupting the notary.
We know," he replied, "that a very great man from Russia, a greater still from France, a minister from Austria, a statesman from Italy, and an envoy from Japan, have been invited to meet a German minister whose name I will not mention, even to you.
Fox in every room in the house: when that statesman was in opposition, I am not sure that she had not flung a main with him; and when he came into office, she took great credit for bringing over to him Sir Pitt and his colleague for Queen's Crawley, although Sir Pitt would have come over himself, without any trouble on the honest lady's part.
The Mr Tite Barnacle who at the period now in question usually coached or crammed the statesman at the head of the Circumlocution Office, when that noble or right honourable individual sat a little uneasily in his saddle by reason of some vagabond making a tilt at him in a newspaper, was more flush of blood than money.