startle

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startle

(stăr′tĕl) [ME. sterten, stand up stiffly; move quickly]
A response to a sudden stimulus marked by jerking body movements and some or all of the following: defensive posture, tremors, sweating, widened pupils, and a temporary increase in pulse and respiratory rates.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The consultation itself raises even more questions than it poses, not least because of its startlingly obvious inquiries.
Under the baton of the thoughtful Kazushi Ono the range of those extreme contrasts inherent in the work was fully explored as he teased out the silences and hushed moments, as well as giving due weight to the startlingly stormy and rapturous climactic sections which portray nothing less than the final judgement day.
After the first two races of this year, however, Hamilton's drives have been startlingly different.
This is the first book on Thelonious Monk based on exclusive access to the Monk family papers and private recordings, as well as a decade of prodigious research, prize-winning author brings to light a startlingly different Thelonious Monk-witty, intelligent, generous, family-oriented, politically engaged, brutally honest, and a devoted father and husband.
But Scotland's top councillor branded health minister Shona Robison "startlingly incompetent" over the plans.
They show us the very different human faces behind the statistics, and some stories are startlingly unexpected.
It was at that exacting locality that I startlingly discovered the baroque communication sourced originally from Arpan.
The star was also said to be looking "startlingly slim" as she displayed her bony physique in a white bikini.
While the text does not shed any startlingly new light on the story it does flesh it out to a wider extent than hitherto.
We may have matured quite unevenly: overgrown and overcompensating here, startlingly beautiful there, and barren in some hidden center that no one else may see.
And one thing that becomes startlingly apparent in a surprisingly short time is how awkward and uncoordinated American vehicles can be under even the most benign circumstances.
Spiky nosegays of lighting fixtures sprouted from the floor, creating a futuristic garden where barefooted Parker Lutz, in a beige unitard with puffy sleeves, performed brief balletic variations to music by Mike Iveson, Bert Janusch, and, most startlingly, given Michelson's experimental pedigree, Leo Delibes (large chunks of the score for Sylvia).