startle

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startle

/star·tle/ (stahr´tl)
1. to make a quick involuntary movement as in alarm, surprise, or fright.
2. to become alarmed, surprised, or frightened.

startle

(stăr′tĕl) [ME. sterten, stand up stiffly; move quickly]
A response to a sudden stimulus marked by jerking body movements and some or all of the following: defensive posture, tremors, sweating, widened pupils, and a temporary increase in pulse and respiratory rates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Startle data were reduced off-line and peak detection was carried out.
Given the fact that the startle blink was evoked in 36 of the 54 pictures, the final unit of analysis was 36 pictures (2).
Startle magnitude was inversely related to the affective valence ratings of the pictures, r = -.
Magnitude and latency of the startle reflex, affective valence ratings, and viewing time were related to the Valence factor, whereas arousal ratings, SCR, heart rate, and viewing time were related to the Arousal factor.
The main aim of this research was to test the two-factor model of the emotional response, by including two indices--magnitude and latency of the startle blink reflex--that have not been used in this type of analyses, and by studying how well these indices fit into this model.
Our data show an affective valence modulation of the startle response, in accordance with past research (e.
The magnitude and latency components of the startle reflex fit into a two-dimensional model of emotion and are related to the affective valence dimension, thus supporting results obtained in previous research works (Lang, 1994, 1995; Lang et al.
Emotion, novelty, and the startle reflex: Habituation in humans.
Some psychologists who argue that prior appraisal is not required to experience emotion also contend that data on the startle reaction would resemble findings for other emotions if stimuli as strong as the blank pistol shot were used.