startle

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startle

/star·tle/ (stahr´tl)
1. to make a quick involuntary movement as in alarm, surprise, or fright.
2. to become alarmed, surprised, or frightened.

startle

(stăr′tĕl) [ME. sterten, stand up stiffly; move quickly]
A response to a sudden stimulus marked by jerking body movements and some or all of the following: defensive posture, tremors, sweating, widened pupils, and a temporary increase in pulse and respiratory rates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Giving up chocolate may therefore lead to weight loss in the short term but all that irritability, frustration and startled blinking is then liable to make them seek solace in the form of chocolate.
As he innocently sped past, the startled mutt attacked, biting him fiercely at the top of his thigh, breaking the skin, and leaving him thanking the heavens his legs weren't an inch shorter.
The New York Times reported that Christie was startled to hear from Mitt Romney's surrogates, demanding to know why he had appeared so close with Obama when they toured to see the damage done by the hurricane.
She says it looks as if he was startled and started play-fighting like elephants do in the wild.
Even though other butterflies and other insects are frequently startled by a photographic flash and flee after their picture is taken, their motor response is normally slower than the shutter speed of the camera.
When a person is startled due to an emotional response, the eyes blink.
Sheep are being fitted with ear muffs to prevent them being startled by a nearby motor festival.
Prosecuting, Ekwal Tiwana said that in September last year five 16-year-old friends were by a bench in a clearing in Yorks Wood at about 10pm when one of them was startled by Everill's Staffordshire bull terrier, Reg.
The startled men dropped the dresser, while Stewart took aim and fired.
It was not initially clear whether the elephant had been startled or whether it had been a 'rogue' animal.
Mauro Bigonzetti startled with contrasts of light and dark, and Christopher Wheeldon cherrypicked ballet's vocabulary and blended it memorably with the contemporary.