startle syndrome

startle syndrome

A rare, autosomal dominant neurological disorder in which affected persons have either brisk reflexes or sudden loss of consciousness with muscular rigidity when suddenly stimulated (e.g., by a loud noise or bright light). Treatment with benzodiazepines, such as clonazepam, is often beneficial.
References in periodicals archive ?
A hereditary startle syndrome. Neurol Sci 1966; 3:577-605.
Also known as 'startle syndrome', the disorder leaves children with an exaggerated startle reflex and prolonged muscle stiffness.
Voluntary stimulus-sensitive jerks and jumps mimicking myoclonus or pathological startle syndromes. Mov Disord.
Cases relate to Parkinson's disease and other Parkinsonian disorders, tremors, chorea, dystonia, ataxia, tics and stereotypies, myoclonus and startle syndromes, and psychogenic movement disorder presentations.
Audiogenic startle reflex of man and its relationship to startle syndromes. Brain, 109, 561-573
A broad range of disorders is covered, including acute dystonic reactions, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, startle syndromes, and tic emergencies.
Another distinct group of disorders associated with myoclonic movements is known as startle syndromes. These disorders, which are characterized by explosive, jerking movement in response to environmental sounds or stimuli, typically involve excessive activity or hyperexcitability of the normal brainstem's "startle circuits." There may also be diminished control in spinal circuits.