borage

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Related to starflower: borage, Starflower oil

borage

/bor·age/ (bor´ij) Borago officinalis or preparations of its flowers, stems, and seeds, which are used in folk medicine for a wide variety of disorders; see also under oil.

borage

(bôr′ĭj, bŏr′-)
n.
An annual bristly herb (Borago officinalis) native to the Mediterranean region, having blue or purplish star-shaped flowers, edible leaves and stems, and seeds containing oil used as a dietary supplement.

borage

an annual herb found in North America and Europe.
uses This herb is used as an antiinflammatory for premenstrual syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Raynaud's disease, and other inflammatory conditions. It is also used to treat atopic dermatitis, infant cradle cap, cystic fibrosis, high blood pressure, and diabetes; effectiveness is not proven.
contraindications Should not be used since it is likely unsafe when used in amounts ingested for medicinal purpose.

borage

Herbal medicine
A mucilaginous annual herb, which contains essential oils, mucilage, pyrrolizidine alkaloids and tanning, and is antipyretic, a mucilage and demulcent. Borage is used by naturopaths to regulate metabolism and hormones, and is believed to be useful for gynaecologic problems including PMS/PMT and menopause.

Toxicity
May be harmful in large doses, given its known liver toxicity; carcinogenic potential.

Pseudomedicine
A floral essence said to provide buoyant courage and optimism.

bor·age

(bōr'ăj)
A herbal prepared from the plant parts and seeds of Borago officinalis. Value as antiinflammatory and tonic. Clinically studied for its value in dermatology; possible use in hepatic and GI disorders. Plant contains toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids.
Synonym(s): beebread, ox's tongue, starflower.
[L.L. burrago, fr. burra, shaggy cloth]

borage (bōrˑ·j),

n Latin name:
Borage officinalis; parts used: seeds, stems, leaves; uses: arthritis, hypertension, common cold, bronchitis; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children. May cause hepatotoxicity. Also called
beebread, common borage, cool tankard, star flower, and
ox's tongue.
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