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starch

 [starch]
1. any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula, (C6H10O5)n; it is the chief storage form of carbohydrates in plants.
2. granular material separated from mature corn (Zea mays), wheat, or potatoes; used as a dusting powder and pharmaceutic aid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

starch

(starch),
A high molecular weight polysaccharide made up of d-glucose residues consisting of 20% amylose and 80% amylopectin. amylose contains α-1,4 linkages, differing from cellulose in the presence of α- rather than β-glucoside linkages, and amylopectin contains additional α-1,6 linkages; both amylose and amylopectin exist in most most plant tissues. Starch is converted into dextrin when subject to the action of dry heat, and into dextrin and d-glucose by amylases and glucoamylases in saliva and pancreatic juice; used as a dusting powder, an emollient, and an ingredient in medicinal tablets; is an important raw material for the manufacture of alcohol, acetone, n-butanol, lactic acid, citric acid, glycerine, and gluconic acid by fermentation; is the chief storage carbohydrate in most higher plants.
Synonym(s): amylum
[A.S. stearc, strong]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

starch

(stärch)
n.
1. A naturally abundant nutrient carbohydrate, (C6H10O5)n, found chiefly in the seeds, fruits, tubers, roots, and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice, and varying widely in appearance according to source but commonly prepared as a white amorphous tasteless powder.
2. starches Foods having a high content of starch, as rice, breads, and potatoes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

starch

(stahrch)
A high molecular weight polysaccharide built up of d-glucose residues in α-1,4 linkage, differing from cellulose in the presence of α- rather than β-glucoside linkages, which exists in most plant tissues; converted into dextrin when subjected to the action of dry heat, and into dextrin and d-glucose by amylases and glucoamylases in saliva and pancreatic juice; used as a dusting powder, an emollient, and an ingredient in medicinal tablets; chief storage carbohydrate in most higher plants.
[A.S. stearc, strong]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

starch

A complex polysaccharide carbohydrate consisting of chains of linked glucose molecules. Amylose is a chain of 200 to 500 glucose units. Amylopectin consists of 20 cross-linked glucose molecules. Most natural starches are a mixture of these two. Starch, in the form of potatoes, rice and cereals forms an important part of the average diet and about 70% of the world's food.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

starch

a polysaccharide carbohydrate consisting of GLUCOSE units arranged in two forms, amylose and amylopectin. Upon heating, the two components are separated, with amylose giving a purplish/blue colour when iodine is added and amylopectin giving a black colour, this forming the standard test for starch. Starch is the principal storage compound of plants as it is compact and non-osmotic. see DEXTRIN.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

starch

(stahrch)
High molecular weight polysaccharide made up of d-glucose residues consisting of 20% amylose and 80% amylopectin.
Synonym(s): amylum.
[A.S. stearc, strong]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Alternative- There will be a significant difference in the fruits, vegetable, starchy vegetables, lutein/zeaxanthin and lycopene intake between the young and old, and between the male and female Hispanic subjects.
Starchy carbohydrates are an important source of energy.
Lessening starchy foods in infant diets may affect adult food preferences.
The senators asked Vilsack to explain the "reasoning for plans to limit starchy vegetables in the school lunch program and to completely restrict starchy vegetables in the school breakfast program." USDA has proposed limiting servings of starchy vegetables--white potatoes, peas, corn and lima beans--to one cup per student per week for federally subsidized school lunches, while completely eliminating all servings from federal school breakfast programs.
What may seem like a thick and resistant pudding or starchy food to some may seem noticeably thin in the mouths of others.
4 Myth: if you have diabetes, you should only eat small amounts of starchy foods.
The same was not true of starchy vegetables such as potato, yam and cassava.
Many people do not realise it is important to eat lots of starchy foods such as bread, rice, potatoes and pasta.
When we first meet her, she has multiple lovers but cannot find her place in her family: her starchy father, her horsey stepmother and two half-sisters with whom she shares nothing.
Another stone fragment yielded the starchy remains of a potato.
These foods are loaded with fat, salt, simple carbs, and acrylamide--a chemical that forms when starchy foods are heated at high temperatures.
It's still starchy and greasy, underseasoned and oversalted, short on fiber, and long on spaghetti.