star


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star

(star),
Any stellate or star-shaped structure.
See also: aster, astrosphere, stella, stellula.
[A.S. steorra]

STAR

Abbreviation for:
Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement
Short-Term Assessment and Rehabilitation team 
signal transduction and activation of RNA
Special Targeted, Abbreviated Review
Specialty Training and Advanced Research
staged abdominal repair
Staphylokinase Recombinant Trial
Start Talking About Recovery
steroidogenic acute regulatory protein 
Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene
Systems Test for Alternative Reimbursement

STAR

Oncology A 5-yr clinical study–Study of Tamoxifen And Raloxifene–to determine whether raloxifene helps prevent breast CA in ♀ and whether it has any benefits over tamoxifen–Nolvadex. See MORE, Raloxifene, Tamoxifen.

star

(stahr)
Any stellate structure.
See also: aster, astrosphere, stella, stellula
[A.S. steorra]
References in classic literature ?
"What seek ye, white men of the Stars--ah, yes, of the Stars? Do ye seek a lost one?
Not stones that shine, not yellow metal that gleams, these thou leavest to 'white men from the Stars.' Methinks I know thee; methinks I can smell the smell of the blood in thy heart.
The team discovered the star systems--2 triplets, 3 pairs, and 15 single stars--using a telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory near La Serena, Chile.
It may be the brightest star ever seen in our galaxy, the Milky Way.
Consider, for instance, the star HD 3651, which is slightly less massive than the sun and just 36 light-years from Earth.
(By their calculations, all the visible stars don't have enough mass, and therefore gravitational pull, to hold galaxies together.)
Although the erupting star briefly became one of the brightest stars in the galaxy, it has now dimmed and become one of the coolest.
Until now, scientists had found the clouds around the star so thick that they couldn't see inside.
Even today, the star, which tips the scale at a whopping 100 solar masses, hurls the equivalent of two Earths of gas and dust into space each day.
Close X-ray scrutiny of the neutron star inside RCW 103 belies that simple picture.
Separately, Grillmair and Odysseas Dionatos of the Astronomical Observatory in Rome found a second star stream, nicknamed the galactic highway, which is 30,000 light-years from Earth.
This young, star-forming region provides a remarkably clear window on star making.