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standard

 [stan´dard]
something established as a measure or model to which other similar things should conform. There are three types of standards in health care: structure, process, and outcome standards. Structure refers to evaluation of the setting in which care is rendered and the resources that are available. Process refers to evaluation of the actual activities carried out by the care giver. Outcome refers to evaluation of the results of activities in which the nurse has been involved (what the result is for the patient).
s's of practice a set of guidelines that identifies the content of practice and serves as a model to guide care towards excellence.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

stan·dard

(stan'dărd),
1. Something that serves as a basis for comparison; a technical specification or written report by experts.
2.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr. estandard, rallying place, fr. Frankish standan, to stand, + hard, hard, fast]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

standard

EBM
In a clinical trial, a criterion or specification established by authority or consensus for:
(1) Measuring performance or quality; and
(2) Specifying conventions that support interchange of common materials and information.

CDISC standards support the exchange of clinical data at syntactic and semantic levels.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

standard

Medtalk A benchmark for measuring and comparing similar or analogous activities or persons. See Air Quality standard, Community standard, Capacity standard, Double standard, Engineering standard, Ergonomic standard, Food standard, Gold standard, Internal standard, Medicare volume performance standard, Ordinary negligence standard, Patient viewpoint standard, Performance standard, Practice standard standard, Prudent layperson standard, Reasonable person standard, Reasonable physician standard, Small parts standard, Zero error standard.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stan·dard

(stan'dărd)
Something that serves as a basis for comparison; a technical specification or written report by experts.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr. estandard, rallying place, fr. Frankish standan, to stand, + hard, hard, fast]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

stan·dard

(stan'dărd)
Something that serves as a basis for comparison; a technical specification or written report by experts.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr. estandard, rallying place, fr. Frankish standan, to stand, + hard, hard, fast]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Cancer incidence rates, crude and age-standardized (World standard population) per 100,000 person-years by primary cancer site in males, 1998-2002 and 2003-2007 Number cases (n); Relative Frequencies (%); Rrude Rate (CR); Age-Standardized Incidence Rate (ASR); Annual Percent Change (APC %).
Freese says dark stars could also have delayed reionization by delaying the formation of standard Population III stars.
The standard population used in this study was the year 1990.
The demographics of all developed countries in Europe, Asia and America are such that the standard population pyramid has been inverted.
standard population. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Note: Table made from bar graph.
To capture this effect, we include a variable for the share of a standard population that would be eligible for Medicaid based on the program eligibility criteria of the state in which the individual lives.
Ultimately, the OHP Standard population must drop from its current 53,000 to 25,000 by next June.
The standard population ratios, which largely rule how electoral boundaries are drawn, would be waived.
"The key benefits of our latest version are its ease of tuning, including the introduction of a "Rule Wizard" that allows non-IT users to enhance any one of the 50+ Standard Population rule-sets with "local" rules, without a requirement to re-build indexes; performance enhancements through "early-exit" match choices; and higher reliability of search and match results through improved Standard Population rules and additional tuning options."
All SEER incidence and mortality rates are age-adjusted to the 1970 United States standard population. The Mississippi Central Cancer Registry (CCR), a population-based cancer registry within the Mississippi State Department of Health and established by the 1993 Legislature, began collecting data in 1996.
Using standard population and mortality data and making "reasonable assumptions" for the share of wealth that is passed on, the Economic Trends article says, "bequests are estimated to have grown just a little faster than labor compensation.

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