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standard

 [stan´dard]
something established as a measure or model to which other similar things should conform. There are three types of standards in health care: structure, process, and outcome standards. Structure refers to evaluation of the setting in which care is rendered and the resources that are available. Process refers to evaluation of the actual activities carried out by the care giver. Outcome refers to evaluation of the results of activities in which the nurse has been involved (what the result is for the patient).
s's of practice a set of guidelines that identifies the content of practice and serves as a model to guide care towards excellence.

stan·dard

(stan'dărd),
1. Something that serves as a basis for comparison; a technical specification or written report by experts.
2.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr. estandard, rallying place, fr. Frankish standan, to stand, + hard, hard, fast]

standard

/stan·dard/ (stan´dard) something established as a measure or model to which other similar things should conform.

standard

Etymology: OFr, estandart
1 n, an evaluation that serves as a basis for comparison for evaluating similar phenomena or substances, such as a standard for the preparation of a pharmaceutic substance or a standard for the practice of a profession.
2 n, a pharmaceutic preparation or a chemical substance of known quantity, ingredients, and strength that is used to determine the constituents or the strength of another preparation.
3 adj, of known value, strength, quality, or ingredients.
4 n, predetermined criteria used to provide guidance in the operation of a health care facility to ensure high-quality performance by the personnel. standardization, n., standardize, v.

standard

EBM
In a clinical trial, a criterion or specification established by authority or consensus for:
(1) Measuring performance or quality; and
(2) Specifying conventions that support interchange of common materials and information.

CDISC standards support the exchange of clinical data at syntactic and semantic levels.

standard

Medtalk A benchmark for measuring and comparing similar or analogous activities or persons. See Air Quality standard, Community standard, Capacity standard, Double standard, Engineering standard, Ergonomic standard, Food standard, Gold standard, Internal standard, Medicare volume performance standard, Ordinary negligence standard, Patient viewpoint standard, Performance standard, Practice standard standard, Prudent layperson standard, Reasonable person standard, Reasonable physician standard, Small parts standard, Zero error standard.

stan·dard

(stan'dărd)
Something that serves as a basis for comparison; a technical specification or written report by experts.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr. estandard, rallying place, fr. Frankish standan, to stand, + hard, hard, fast]

stan·dard

(stan'dărd)
Something that serves as a basis for comparison; a technical specification or written report by experts.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr. estandard, rallying place, fr. Frankish standan, to stand, + hard, hard, fast]

standard

something established as a measure or model to which other similar things should conform.

bacteriological standard of meat
the standard bacterial count of meat beyond which local legislation forbids the sale or use of meat. The international standard is for <107/g of meat and that Salmonella spp. should not be present in more than one of five 25 g samples, all held at 95°F (35°C) or 68°F (20°C) for chilled meat.
standard bicarbonate
in blood gas analysis this is the plasma level of bicarbonate, under specified conditions, which eliminates the influence of respiration on the values obtained.
standard deviation
a measure of the dispersal of a random variable; the square root of the average squared deviation from the mean. For data that have a normal distribution about 68% of the data points fall within one standard deviation from the mean and 95% fall within two standard deviations. Symbol is σ.
standard error
the standard deviation of an estimate.
standard error of mean
the sampling variability of the mean.
standard international (SI) units
see Table 3.
standard population
a population not yet divided into classes; the population against which each of its constituent classes can be compared.
standard Salmonella pullorum strains
strains that contain only small amounts of 122 antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
I examine how each of these four factors has evolved and has contributed to changes in standard of living in Ontario, Quebec and the United States during the 15-year period 1999-2014.
2) Our standard of living should be higher because we're better educated and we work harder.
But while 71 % of people aged under 35 thought they would equal or better their retired relatives' standard of living, just 38% of people aged over 55 felt the same way.
Moskowitz ends by showing how the standard of living, intended to be an unassailably objective statistical tool, was, of course, a construction: a cultural self-perception based equally on social science and advertising.
That skepticism is matched by workers' lack of faith in their employers' ability to deliver promised benefits, even in countries where most employees are reasonably confident they will be able to maintain their current standard of living when they retire.
Highly recommended for anyone coming to grips with the difficulty of properly preparing for the future while maintaining a decent standard of living in the present.
NORDIC BUSINESS REPORT-15 March 2004-Finnish standard of living level with EU and OECD countries - report(C)1994-2004 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.
Granted that these frugal employers are influenced as much by a desire to stay solvent and avoid relocation as by greed, and that the last thing we need is more governmental regulation, this nevertheless manifests as yet another force driving down the American standard of living.
It brings in money from exports; that helps us pay for our social services and maintains our standard of living.
The affluent are concerned about the wife's standard of living if the husband dies first--with 29% of married affluent households saying it is a major concern.
They also point to international human rights treaties--to which Canada is a signatory--that guarantee all people the right to an adequate standard of living including food, shelter and clothing.

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