stance time

stance time

The duration of the stance phase in the gait cycle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mean values were calculated for step time, stance time, swing time, step length and step velocity.
Specific topics include comparing ordinary and elite runners, improving foot-strike pattern, shortening stance time and increasing cadence, running shoes and form, and integrating form work into seasonal training.
Our results showed that increased speed was associated with higher strike frequency, shorter stance time, and increased the vertical and anterior-posterior GRF during impact.
Likewise, it was observed that the velocity of gait was 1.2 m/s, the length of the step was 70.47 cm, the width of the step was 9.3 cm with a cadence of 102.2 spm, stance time 0.36 s and swing time 0.237 s.
The typical effects of aging on the basic gait parameters include shorter stride length, shorter step length and cadence, higher stance time and double support time in the elderly [3-4, 13].
[1] The affected limb exhibits a prolonged period of swing and a reduced period of stance; as a result, decreased swing time and increased stance time are seen on the unaffected limb.
Stance time (s)--Duration of the time taken from first point of contact to the last video frame of contact with the ground (Murphy et al., 2003).
The researchers used gait criteria, such as stride length, ambulatory time, gait speed, step count, cadence, stance time, and arm swing.
In addition, for both protocols, CT was longest in the metatarsal regions, and the metatarsal heads bore weight for 68.5% to 82.8% of the stance time in the WOT protocol and for 66.3% to 82.4% in the WT protocol, both of which are comparable with previous studies [8, 9,11,13].
Far afield from the basic pedometers and other crude wearables that have been around for years--including, now, even GPS devices which once seemed exotic--the new generation of training devices includes features that can measure stride length, heel-toe footstrike ratios, stance time and cadence.
Consequently, basic spatiotemporal gait parameters including the step length, stance time, and cadence were automatically measured from these two phases.
concluded that exercise intervention improved patient strength and balance because group differences were statistically significant for knee flexion strength (P = 0.035) and single-leg stance time (P = 0.029).