stance phase

stance phase

The gait phase that lasts from heel strike to toe off, which accounts for 60% of a single gait cycle. During the stance phase, the foot is on the ground acting as a shock absorber, mobile adapter, rigid lever and pedestal, and the body passes over its top. Stance phase can be subdivided into contact phase and support phase.

stance phase

weight-bearing phase of gait cycle, i.e. when foot is in contact with walking surface (see gait; Table 1)
Table 1: Phases of the gait cycle during walking
Phase of the cycleFeatures of the phaseProportion of the cycle
Stance phaseGround contact
Single-limb support
60%
40%
Double-limb support20%
Swing phaseNo ground contact
Limb in front of torso
Limb behind torso
40%
References in periodicals archive ?
1997) also found a non-significant increase in hip and knee flexion during single leg stance phase compared to controls (34[degrees] flexion throughout stance, compared to 32[degrees] at the hip and 8[degrees] flexion during stance compared to 3[degrees] flexion at the knee).
This continues for the rest of the stance phase, causing the patient to push-off with an unlocked pronated foot.
During this dance step the stance phase was twice as long as the swing phase, which was similar to straight line walking during which 60% of the cycle duration is in the stance phase.
A significant increase in opposite foot contact, indicating a longer stance phase, was seen with use of AFO on the affected side (p=0.
The external knee adduction moment (KAM) is generally created during the stance phase when the ground reaction force (GRF) vector is positioned medial to the knee's axis of rotation in the frontal plane and has been prospectively linked to the development of knee OA (Lynn and Costigan, 2008, Teichtahl et al.
Specifically, slower walking speeds, shorter strides [7,14-16], increased stance time [10-11,16-17], decreased ROM at the hip and knee during the stance phase, increased ankle ROM during the stance phase [10,19-20], and reduced propulsion forces and push-off power [11,15,17,21] have been noted in both populations.
14) The anterior fibers are important in maintaining pelvic stability along with the middle fibers across the stance phase of the gait cycle.
In particular, motor rehabilitation program reduced temporal variables in the stance phase and increased the swing phase; only the single support phase was decreased, while the double stance phase was not significantly changed after traditional rehabilitation program [12].
Table 4 shows the proportion of stance phase over which load was applied on the heel, mid-foot and MTH area at pre-operative and post-operative assessments of dynamic weight bearing.
In the stance phase, when the leg is on the ground, the impedance felt by the user is approximately the impedance of the joints of the leg (since the ground impedance is high).