stammer

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stam·mer

(stam'ĕr),
1. To hesitate in speech, halt, repeat, and mispronounce, by reason of embarrassment, agitation, unfamiliarity with the topic, or as yet unidentified physiologic causes. Compare: stutter.
2. To mispronounce or transpose certain consonants in speech.
[A.S. stamur]

stammer

(stăm′ər)
v. stam·mered, stam·mering, stam·mers
v.intr.
To speak with involuntary pauses or repetitions.
v.tr.
To utter with involuntary pauses or repetitions.
n.
A way of speaking characterized by involuntary pauses or repetitions.

stam′mer·er n.
stam′mer·ing·ly adv.

stam·mer

(stam'ĕr)
To hesitate in speech, halt, repeat, and mispronounce, by reason of embarrassment, agitation, unfamiliarity with the topic, or as yet unidentified physiologic causes.
[A.S. stamur]
References in periodicals archive ?
Each of the TV six was allotted a personal coach who was a former stammerer from seven in the morning to ten at night, the students were allowed to talk to no-one but their coaches, and within 48 hours they were required to go out in public and speak to 100 people, asking the time, the way to the shops etc.
Stammerers tend to have similar feelings - but more so
But all stammerers have trouble with their names because it is so tied up with their identities.
Their coaches know exactly what they're going through because they are all former stammerers themselves.
I only hope the youngest stammerer featured, 12-year-old Max Drake, gets the opportunity to visit the Starfish project.
He tells stammerers to imagine they are being rushed into talking.
The intensive and emotionallycharged residential course is run by for-mer stammerers, using physical and psychological techniques and has already transformed the lives of many - including pop tar Gareth Gates.
Last year he stole our hearts by overcoming his stammer - and next week another one-off programme will follow his progress at an intensive course that helps stammerers to find their voice.
IT is a treatment programme run by stammerers (stutterers) which involves the use of costal breathing (also known as diaphragmatic breathing) to control the condition.
The Association has fantastic resources available to stammerers on their website, and they are launching a number of work-related initiatives in the UK this year.
Scientists in China tested 28 stammerers who were treated with a therapy that involved repeating two-syllable words and then reading words presented visually.