stalk

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stalk

(stawk),
A narrowed connection with a structure or organ.

stalk

(stôk)
n.
A slender or elongated support or structure, as one that connects or supports an organ.
Anatomy noun The cord-like structure that connects the pituitary gland to the hypothalamus
Pathology noun A neck-like fibrovascular structure that connects a pedunculated polyp to the mucosa in a neoplasm—e.g., an adenomatous polyp or villous adenoma
Public safety verb To actively pursue, harass, or threaten a person who is an unwilling recipient of the stalker’s advances

stalk

verb Public health To actively pursue, harass, or threaten a person who is an unwilling recipient of the stalker's advances

stalk

(stawk)
A narrowed connection with a structure or organ.

stalk

(stawk)
A narrowed connection with a structure or organ.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whatever happens to her or me we must both thank God for 20 years of the most unalloyed and intense happiness." Sentiment with a stiff upper lip and Stalky was off.
Invited to see himself reflected as the journalist Gigadibs in "Bishop Blougram's Apology," the future editor of the school's paper proceeded to devour all major poems in that "brown-backed volume." The "quietly annexed" and "quarter-comprehended verses" absorbed by Beetle in Stalky "lived and ate with him, as the dew-dropped pages showed." (6) As a Browning-like ventriloquist, the young Kipling soon assumed the voices of others with such ease that his class-mate G.
In January 1918 Major-General Lionel Dunsterville--a school chum of Rudyard Kipling and a prime inspiration for Kipling's Stalky, of Stalky & Co, the stories for boys--had set off with 12 officers and 41 men from Baghdad to establish the British military mission in Tbilisi and to thwart the Turkish advance into the Caucasus.
His best known novels are "The Light that Failed" (1891), "Captains Courageous" (1897), "Stalky & Co." (1899), and "Kim" (1901), which is set in India and deals with the relationship of the British and the Indians.
And partly because English public schools continued the tradition of Latin verse translation throughout the nineteenth century, as noted in Kipling's Stalky and Co.: "I have seen M'Turk being hounded up the stairs to elegise the Elegy in a Churchyard." For those who matured in this tradition, the temptation to compose in Latin undoubtedly returned in adult life as well.
The quaint clothes and postures of the subjects at the beginning of the collection and the start of the war give way to unfashionable but never outdated bodies of the unclothed dead: Now the forts of Antwerp, broken into blocks, slide into a moat as bergs break off into the sea; the blocks, metamorphosed into the dead, sprawl naked as grave-mounds in the stalky fields[.]
Hyde (1886), Stevenson plainly splits the masochistic personality in two, with Jekyll representing the omnipotent power of the fantasist and Hyde violently acting out the anger and shame that frequently motivate the masochist in the first place (although, typically, these roles can also be reversed--a pattern that Kucich sees in the alternating bullies and victims of Kipling's later story collection Stalky & Co.
Are your eyes stalky? A crab's eyes are at the end of long stalks so he can see enemies better.
When I was 11, I read Rudyard Kipling's brilliant teen novel "Stalky & Co." for the first time and was perplexed by this passage: "Pay me my interest, or I'll charge you interest on interest.
She had been tall for her age, stalky and angry-eyed as field grass.
The hemp plant is tall and stalky; the marijuana plant is short and shrub-like, with "buds."
Its title apparently influenced by Kipling's Stalky & Co.