stain

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stain

 [stān]
1. a substance used to impart color to tissues or cells, to facilitate microscopic study and identification.
2. an area of discoloration of the skin.
acid-fast stain a staining procedure for demonstrating acid-fast microorganisms.
differential stain one that facilitates differentiation of various elements in a specimen.
endogenous stain an intrinsic stain acquired during tooth development.
exogenous stain an intrinsic stain acquired after a tooth has erupted.
extrinsic stain a stain that can be removed from a tooth surface by polishing.
Giemsa stain a solution containing azure II-eosin, azure II-glycerin, and methanol; used for staining protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium and Trypanosoma, for Chlamydia, for differential staining of blood smears, and for viral inclusion bodies. Stained elements appear pink to purple to blue.
Gram stain a staining procedure in which bacteria are stained with crystal violet, treated with strong iodine solution, decolorized with ethanol or ethanol-acetone, and counterstained with a contrasting dye; those retaining the stain are called gram-positive, and those losing the stain but staining with the counterstain are called gram-negative.
hematoxylin and eosin stain a mixture of hematoxylin in distilled water and aqueous eosin solution, employed universally for routine examination of tissues.
intrinsic stain a stain that is within the enamel of a tooth and cannot be removed by polishing.
metachromatic stain one that produces in certain elements a color different from that of the stain itself.
nuclear stain one that selectively stains cell nuclei, generally a basic stain.
port-wine stain a persistent dark red to purple nevus flammeus that grows proportionately with the affected child and is usually found on the face. Initially it is macular, but the surface may develop angiomatous overgrowths with time. Port-wine stains often occur in association with other congenital abnormalities.
supravital stain a stain introduced in living tissue or cells that have been removed from the body.
tumor stain an area of increased density in a radiograph, due to collection of contrast material in distorted and abnormal vessels, prominent in the capillary and venous phases of arteriography, and presumed to indicate neoplasm.
vital stain a stain introduced into the living organism, and taken up selectively by various tissue or cellular elements.
Wright's stain a mixture of eosin and methylene blue, used for demonstrating blood cells and malarial parasites.

stain

(stān),
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic techniques
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color the constituents of cells and tissues. For individual dyes or staining substances, see the specific names.
[M.E. steinen]

stain

(stān)
v. stained, staining, stains
v.tr.
To treat (a specimen for the microscope) with a reagent or dye in order to identify cell or tissue structures or microorganisms.
n.
A reagent or dye used for staining microscopic specimens.

stain′a·ble adj.
stain′er n.

stain

(stān)
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic technique.
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color the constituents of cells and tissues.
[M.E. steinen]

stain

(stān)
1. To discolor.
2. To color; to dye.
3. A discoloration.
4. A dye used in histologic and bacteriologic techniques
5. A procedure in which a dye or combination of dyes and reagents is used to color constituents of cells and tissues.
[M.E. steinen]
References in periodicals archive ?
Cotton stainer, Dysdercus koenigii (Hemiptera: Pyrrhocoridae) was reared using four rearing methods including cylindrical perforated plastic bottles (CPPB), cotton seeds in soil (CSS), cotton seeds without soil (CSWS) and integrated rearing technique (IRT) at Lab.
The shortest longevity value (2.33 days) of cotton stainer was observed in CSS method.
Key words: Cotton stainer, Dysdercus koenigii, rearing methods, cylindrical perforated plastic bottles, moist cotton seed, integrated rearing technique, fecundity, biocontrol agent.
Multi-slide systems available today incorporate automated maintenance and calibration routines, making operation simple and vastly reducing the maintenance burden associated with spray and bath stainers. They offer standardization across all slides and consume minimal reagents, generating large reductions in waste disposal over manual staining.
Multi-slide cuvette stainers with electrooptical decolorization now offer the benefits of random access gram staining to high-volume microbiology laboratories.
The future of automated slide stainers for IHC preparation of patient slides will meet those goals at several levels.
"The most significant advance in the area of staining and coverslipping is linked systems that automatically move slides from the stainer to the coverslipper--providing true, walkaway convenience.
One of the most important aspects of special stainers that requires further explanation is whether a system is "closed" or "open," which has both conceptual and physical implications.
Another technologically significant aspect of these special stainers is the means by which reagents are applied to slides.
The RSG 61 Hematology Slide Stainer with battery backup from Sakura Finetek, Torrance, CA, offers increased throughput by using three slide carriers of 20 slides each.
In puncturing an orange, acotton stainer often inserts its beak up to the full length with no visible wound.It has also been confirmed from the literature study that other than the cotton stainer there are also a complex of stink bugs that cause warts in the internal carpel wall of cotton bolls similar to the damage caused by the cotton stainer.
Cotton stainer: A future threat to cotton in Pakistan, Islamabad, Pakistan.ATWAL, A.S., 1976.